Head of Department

Dr Su Su San

Contact Phone

+959 422 482 251

Contact Mail

phphilosophy@patheinuniversity.edu.mm

———————————————————————————————————

 
Faculty Members
List of Conferred Degrees of the Teachers
Degrees Available (Day Students)
Degrees Available (Distance Education Students)
Faculty Members
  • Professors ( 2 )

  • Associate Professor ( 2 )

  • Lecturers ( 3 )

  • Assistant Lecturers ( 2 )

  • Tutors ( – )

List of Conferred Degrees of the Teachers
  • List of PhD ( 2 )

  • M.A ( 7 )

Degrees Available (Day Students)
  • BA (Philosophy)

  • BA (Honours) (Philosophy)

  • MA (Philosophy)

  • MA (Philosophy)

Degrees Available (Distance Education Students)
  • BA (Philosophy)

Sr. Title Researcher 1 Researcher 2 Researcher 3 Specialization Field of Research
Name Name Name
1 A Comparative Study of National Goal and Philosophy of Education of John Dewey Su Su San Thant Zaw Philosophy of Education Philosophy of Education
2 A Study of the Way of Philosophical Approach to the Modern Thinking in Buddha’s Scriptures Daw Ohnmar Khaing U Myo Lwin Philosophy of Cultutre Buddhist Culture

———————————————————————————————————

Curriculum for Philosophy Specialization

1 First Year (BA)
2 Second Year (BA)
3 Third Year (BA)
4 Fourth Year (BA)
5 First Year (Honours)
6 Second Year (Honours)
7 Third Year (Honours) & Q
8 First Year (MA)
9 Second Year (MA)
1 First Year (BA)

SEMESTER - I

Module No.

Name of Module

Credit Points

Hours Per Week

Lecture

Tutorial

မ ၁၀၀၁

မြန်မာစာ

3

2

2

Eng 1001

English

3

2

2

Phil 1101

Deductive Logic-I

4

3

2

Phil 1102

Introduction to Western Philosophy-I

4

3

2

Elective-I

*

3

2

2

AM 1001

Aspects of Myanmar

3

2

2

 

                    Total

20

14

12

Total Credits (20)

Total Hours (26)

Foundation Courses

မ ၁၀၀၁ (3)           မြန်မာစာ

Eng 1001 (3)        English

Core Courses

Phil.1101 (4)     Deductive Logic-I       

Phil.1102 (4)     Introduction to Western Philosophy-I

 

*Elective Courses (for Philosophy specialization)                                                               

AM 1001 (3)           Aspects of Myanmar

Hist 1001 (3)           Introduction to Myanmar Civilization-I

Hist 1002 (3)           Renaissance Italy (14th Century to 15th Century)   

Hist 1003 (3)           World History to 1500 I

Hist 1004 (3)           World History 1500-1900 I                   

Geog 1003 (3)         Geography of Southeast Asian Countries                              

OS 1001 (3)            Fundamentals of the Pāli Language

OS 1002 (3)            Fundamentals of the Sanskrit Language

OS 1003 (3)            Buddhist Culture

OS 1004 (3)            Buddhist Ethics                                                      

Psy 1001 (3)           Psychology of Adolescence

Psy 1002 (3)           Child Psychology                   

Psy 1003 (3)           Public Relations

Psy 1004 (3)           General Psychology-I                                                                           

IR 1002 (3)             Introduction to International Relations-I                                 

မ ၁၀၀၅ (3)             မြန်မာ့ရိုးရာပုံပြင် (၁)

Anth 1001 (3)         Introduction to General Anthropology-I

Math 1002 (3)         Mathematics-I

LI 1001 (3)              Information Sources of Library (Part-I)                                                   

Elective Courses (for other specializations)                                       

Phil 1001 (3)           Logic in Practice-I                                                  

Phil 1002 (3)           Moral Values in Myanmar Culture-I

Phil 1005 (3)           Mathematical Logic-I

PS 1002                  Introduction to Political Philosophy-I (for Political Science Specialization)

* A student will have to take two electives (one elective and AM 1001) from among those offered.

 

Module No.             : Phil 1101

Module Name        : Deductive Logic-1

COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • Logic is concerned with reasoning. It is both an art and a science. So, it investigates, develops and systematizes principles and methods. It can be used to distinguish between correct and incorrect reasoning. These lessons give students benefits in their daily life.
  • The frame of the course is based on the topics of;
  1. Introduction to Logic
  2. A Study of Logical Fallacies

2.1. The Functions of Language

2.2. Material Fallacies

2.3. Formal Fallacies

  1. A Study of Propositions
  2. A Study of Immediate Inferences

4.1. The Study of Logical Relations

4.2. Distribution of the Terms in Propositions

4.3. The Traditional Square of Opposition

4.4. Establishing logical relations between propositions

      

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to improve the ability to think carefully and critically and writing skills which is essential for success in any field of work,
  • to provide the students’ ability to identify common fallacies in arguments,
  • to understand the structure of different kinds of arguments,
  • to develop the ability to reason critically,
  • to apply the principles of logic to ordinary language reasoning.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the course, students will be able to -

  • apply the ability to reason critically to any issue,
  • improve their skills of discussion, argumentation and listening,
  • choose ways of thinking in practical life.

 

Module No.             : Phil 1102

Module Name        : Introduction to Western Philosophy-I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-    Introduction to Western Philosophy-1 is the study of the ancient Greek thought. It is classified into three main periods: the pre-Socratic period, the period from the Sophists to Aristotle and the post-Aristotelian period. The students will learn why the original source of nearly every field of knowledge in those three periods is important.

  • The frame of the course is based on the following topics;
  1. Introduction to Western Philosophy
  2. The development of Early Greek Philosophy

2.1. The Pre-Socratic Philosophers

2.2. Socrates and the Sophists

  1. A General Study of Plato's Philosophy
  2. A General Study of Aristotle's Philosophy

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to make students understand the meaning and definition of philosophy,
  • to introduce some general characteristics and the branches of philosophy,
  • to have the knowledge of the Pre-Socratic philosophers,
  • to acquaint them with the philosophical thoughts of Sophists and Socrates,
  • to enable them to realize some general philosophies of Plato and Aristotle,
  • to know the decline of Greek thought after Aristotle.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the course, students will be able to-

  • categorize the distinctive characters of the ancient Greek philosophies,
  • improve their ways of thinking in daily life using systematic thinking methods.

 

SYLLABUS OF Elective Courses

(for other specializations)

Module No.             : Phil 1001

Module Name        : Logic in Practice - I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   Logic is the study of reasoning. This module covers the fallacies of arguments, some basic  rules of propositions, syllogisms and problem solving. The students will learn how to apply the two kinds of knowledge to daily life-problem solving, how to use truth-table and to check deductive validity; how to solve the Mediate Inferences’ validity. This module will improve students' critical thinking skill, evaluative thinking skill and analytic thinking skills.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics of;

Introduction to Logic

          1.1. What is Logic? 

          1.2. Thinking and Reasoning

          1.3. Reasoned Knowledge and Perceptual Knowledge

          1.4. Validity and Invalidity

          1.5. Two Kinds of Reasoning

  1. A study of Logical Fallacies

  2.1. Classification of Fallacies

  2.2. Fallacies of Ambiguity

  2.3. Circular Reasoning,

  2.4. False Cause

  2.5. Premises and Conclusions

  2.6. Diagrams for Single Arguments,

  2.7. Recognizing Arguments

  2.8. Passages Containing Several Arguments

  1. A Study of Propositions

  3.1. Changing Ordinary Language to Logical Form

  3.2. The Nature of Proposition      

  3.3. Kinds of Propositions

  3.4. A, E, I, O Propositions and Venn's Diagrams

  1. A Study of Immediate Inference

    4.1. The Study of Logical Relation 

    4.2. Distribution of Terms in the A, E, I, O Proposition 

    4.3. Traditional Square of Oppositions

    4.4. Establishing Logical Relation between Propositions

  1. A Study of Mediate Inferences

        5.1. The Categorical Syllogism

5.1.1. General Rules of Categorical Syllogism

5.1.2. Special Rules of The Four Figures

5.1.3. Some other Rules and their Proofs.

  5.2. The Mixed Syllogism

          5.2.1. Different Kinds of Mixed Syllogism

          5.2.2. Testing the Validity of Mixed Syllogism

  1. The Utility of Deductive Logic for daily life- Problem Solving

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to improve learners’ the ability to reason logically,
  • to enable learners to distinguish the structure of different kinds of arguments,
  • to enhance their ability to classify the values of fallacies.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After studying the module, students will be able to -

  • apply the ability to reason logically,
  • demonstrate their skills of discussion, argumentation and listening,
  • utilize ways of thinking in their daily lives.

 

Module No. : Phil 1002

Module Name : Ethical Values in Myanmar Society - I

  1. Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Society

   1.1. Historical and Geographical Background of Myanmar Culture

   1.2. The Nature of Myanmar Thought

   1.3. Buddhist Ethics and Myanmar Morality

  1. A Study of Western Moral Views from the aspects of Myanmar Moral Thought

2.1. Consequentialism and Non-consequentialism

2.2. Freedom and Determinism

 

Module No. : PS 1002 (for Political Science Specialization)

Module Name        : Introduction to Political Philosophy - I

  1. Nature and Scope of Political Philosophy

1.1. The Difference between Political Philosophy and Political Science

1.2. What is Political Philosophy?

1.2.1. Origin of Political Philosophy

1.2.2.  Problems of Political Philosophy

  1. Essential Political Concepts

2.1. Freedom

2.2. Equality

2.3. Fairness and Justice

2.4. Rights

2.5. Duty and Obligation

2.6. Democracy

 

Module No.             : Phil 1005

Module Name        : Mathematical Logic - I (for Mathematics specialization)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   Mathematical (Advanced or Symbolic) logic determines the validity or invalidity of arguments by means of the special technical symbols. This module covers the theory of truth-functions the method of deduction. Students will learn how to use methods that are easier and shorter than the method of truth table, how to determine the truth-value of the components, how to develop the method of analyzing, symbolizing and establishing the proofs of validity or invalidity of arguments. These will give them enough knowledge to answer any exercise in the truth-functional logic.

-   The frame of the course bases on the topics of;

  1. A Brief History of Logic
  2. Truth Functional Logic

2.1. Simple and Compound Statements

2.1.1. Conjunction

2.1.2. Negation

2.1.3. Disjunction

2.2. The Nature of Implication

2.3. Argument Forms and Truth Tables    

    2.4. Truth-value Analyses

2.4.1. Matrix Method

2.4.2. Quine's Method

2.4.3. Polish Method        

    2.5. Tautologies, Contradictions and Contingencies

2.6. Material Equivalences

    2.7. Testing   Implications and Equivalences by Quine's Method

  1. The method of deduction

3.1. Formal Proof of validity

3.1.1. Nine Rules of Inference         

3.1.2. Ten Rules of Replacement

3.2. Incompleteness of the Nineteen Rules

3.3. The Rules of Conditional Proof

3.4. The Rule of Indirect Proof

3.5. Proof of Tautologies

3.6. Proving Invalidity

3.7. Shorter Truth Table Technique (Reductio ad Absurdum Method)               

3.8. The Strengthened Rule of Conditional Proof

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to make students realize the different methods of Truth-value analysis,
  • to enable them to apply these methods to the logic problems,
  • to convince them what the method of deduction and its advantages are,
  • to acquaint them with the nineteen valid rules of inference and their proofs of validity.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the course, students will be able to -

  • practice the method of Advanced logic that will give them the correct methods of reasoning,
  • to determine the truth-value of the components,
  • to develop the method of analyzing, symbolizing and establishing the proofs of validity or invalidity of arguments,
  • apply the ability of distinguishing valid or invalid argument for effectiveness in their daily life,
  • analyze logical propositions and truth tables,
  • determine the validity or invalidity of arguments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------           

 SEMESTER-II

Module No.

Name of Module

Credit Points

Hours Per Week

Lecture

Tutorial

မ ၁၀၀၂

မြန်မာစာ

3

2

2

Eng 1002

English

3

2

2

Phil 1103

Deductive Logic-II

4

3

2

Phil 1104

Introduction to Western Philosophy-II

4

3

2

Elective-I

*

3

2

2

AM 1002

Aspects of Myanmar

3

2

2

 

                    Total

20

14

12

Total Credits (20)

Total Hours (26)

Foundation Courses

မ ၁၀၀၂           မြန်မာစာ

Eng 1002        English

Core Courses                                                                                

Phil 1103        Deductive Logic - II                                                

Phil 1104        Introduction to Western Philosophy - II 

 

Elective Courses (for Philosophy specialization)                                                                                                          

AM 1002         Aspects of Myanmar

Hist 1005                Introduction to Myanmar Civilization - II

Hist 1006                Reformation Europe (1450-1650)          

Hist 1007 World History to 1500 - II

Hist 1008 World History 1500-1900 - II

Geog 1004              Geography of Myanmar                                         

OS 1005  Pāli Language

OS 1006  Sanskrit Language

OS 1007  Pāli Literature

OS 1008  History of Buddhism                                             

Psy 1005 Understanding Human Interaction

Psy 1006 Nervous System and Behaviour

Psy 1007 General Psychology-II                                           

IR 1004   Introduction to International Relations - II                                             

မ ၁၀၀၈     မြန်မာ့ရိုးရာပုံပြင် (၂)

Anth 1003               Introduction to General Anthropology - II

Anth 1004               Introduction to Cultural Anthropology - II                                             

Math 1004               Mathematics - II

LI 1003   Information Sources of Library (Part - II)

LI 1004   Data Finding Methods (Part - II)                           

Elective Courses (for other specializations)                            

Phil 1003 Logic in Practice - II                                               

Phil 1004 Moral Values in Myanmar Culture - II

Phil 1006 Mathematical Logic-II

PS 1004  Introduction to Political Philosophy - II (for Political Science Specialization)

 * A student will have to take two electives (one elective and AM 1002) from among those offered.

 

Module No.             : Phil 1103

Module Name        : Deductive Logic - II

COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • Logic is the study of sound reasoning and arguments. It investigates the relationship between propositions. This module covers some basic rules, concepts and skills of logic. Students will learn how to use Categorical Syllogism, Mixed Syllogism and Poly-syllogisms to check the validity of deductive arguments; how to Utility of Deductive Logic for daily life These skills have lifelong benefits for improving one’s writing, thinking, critical assessment of ideas and personal autonomy.
  • The frame of the course is based on the topics of;

A Study of Mediate Inferences

  1. The Categorical Syllogism

1.1. The Nature and General Rules of Categorical Syllogisms

1.2. Testing the Validity of Categorical Syllogism

       1.2.1. Testing by General Rules                      

       1.2.2. Testing by Special Rules of Four figures

       1.2.3. Testing by Venn’s Diagram

1.3. Some other rules and their proofs.

  1. The Mixed Syllogism

2.1. Different kinds of Mixed Syllogism

2.2. Testing the validity of Mixed Syllogism   

  1. A Study of Mediate Inference, A Study of Poly-syllogisms, Sorities, Epicherima,

          Enthymemes

  1. The Utility of Deductive Logic for daily life (Problem solving)

4.1. Changing ordinary language to logical forms

4.2. Diagrams for Single Arguments

4.3. Recognizing Arguments

4.4. Passages Containing Several Arguments

                

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this module are -

  • to make students understand the nature of Mediate Inferences and the nature of Syllogism,
  • to let them test the validity of syllogism by Venn’s diagrams,
  • to help them realize the reason for the rules of Mixed Syllogism,
  • to enable them to know the nature of Enthymemes, Sorities and Epicherima,
  • to enable them to realize the use of Deductive Logic in daily life,

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On completion of the module, students will be able to-

  • determine validity or invalidity of an argument by several rules,
  • explain sound and unsound of syllogisms,
  • apply Deductive Logic in daily life

 

Module No.                            : Phil 1104

Module Name        : Introduction to Western Philosophy-II

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   Introduction to Western Philosophy-II is the study of Medieval and Modern philosophy. The medieval philosophy is only the theological explanations of the ethical problems. It is the philosophy of religion or theology. Modern philosophy focuses on the shift from epistemology to metaphysics. It presents two trends of thought: Rationalism and Empiricism. German idealism, Immanuel Kant combined the two extreme doctrines of rationalism and empiricism.

  • The frame of the course is based on the following topics;
  1. A Study of Medieval Philosophy
  2. A Study of Modern Philosophy

2.1. Rationalism Vs Empiricism

2.1.1. René Descartes

2.1.2. Baruch Spinoza

2.1.3. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz&l

2 Second Year (BA)

Semester - I

Module No.

Name of Module

Credit Points

Hours Per Week

Lecture

Tutorial

Eng 2001

English

3

2

2

Phil 2101

Eastern Philosophy-I

4

3

2

Phil 2102

Inductive Logic-I

4

3

2

Phil 2103

Twentieth Century Western Philosophy-I

4

3

2

Elective I

*

3

2

2

Elective II

*

3

2

2

 

Total

21

15

12

Total Credits (21) 

Total Hours (27)

Foundation Course  

Eng 2001       English 

Core Courses                        

Phil 2101       Eastern Philosophy - I                         

Phil 2102       Inductive Logic - I                              

Phil 2103       Twentieth Century Western Philosophy - I     

Elective Courses (for Philosophy specialization)   

Hist 2001        History of Science and Technology-I

Hist 2002        World History 1900 to Present-I                   

Geog 2005      Political Geography-I                         

OS 2001          Pāli Language-I

OS 2002          Buddha dassana-I

OS 2003          Pāli Literature (Prose)

OS 2004          Buddhist Councils-I

OS 2005          Pāli Philology

Psy 2001         Language and Thought

Psy 2002         The Development of Self-Concept

Psy 2003         Occupational Psychology-I                            

Eng 2003         Developing Communicative Skills-I  

မ ၂၀၀၄             မြန်မာအမျိုးသမီးစာဆိုများနှင့်၎င်းတို့၏စာများ (၁)

Math 2002       Mathematics-I

LI 2001           Effective Use of Information Centre

LI 2002           Libraries in Myanmar Society

Phil 2104         The Cultural and Ethical Aspects of Environmental Conservation-I

Phil 2105         Philosophical Foundations of Jurisprudence-I           

Elective Courses (for other specializations)

Phil 2001         History of Western Intellectual Development-I

Phil 2002         Ethics of Environmental Conservation-I

Phil 2003         Aesthetics-I    

Phil 2004         Philosophy of Law-I

Phil 2015         Elementary Logic-I

* A student will have to take two electives.

Module No                 : Phil 2101

Module Name            : Eastern Philosophy - I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-  Eastern Philosophy-I discusses the different problems. Every problem is discussed from all possible approaches. Indian schools of thought can be classified as non-orthodox schools and orthodox schools. These schools are different from each other. But there are general characteristics among them. This course covers the basic concept of the various Indian schools of thoughts. Students will learn why it is defined as non-orthodox schools and orthodox schools. By this study, students will come to understand the various ideas of Indian philosophers.

-  The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. Introduction to Eastern Philosophy
  2. The Genesis of Indian Philosophy

2.1. The General Characteristic of Indian Philosophy

2.2. The Stages and Development of Indian Philosophy

  1. A General Survey of Indian Philosophical Schools

3.1. The Heterodox Schools

3.1.1. The Carvaka System       

3.1.2. The Jaina System            

3.1.3. The Buddha System

3.2. The Orthodox Schools

3.2.1. The Nyaya-Vaisesika      

3.2.2. The Sankhya-Yoga System  

3.2.3. The Mimamsa System     

3.2.4. The Vedanta System

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help students understand the development of Indian Philosophy,
  • to give them a chance to study the Heterodox schools of thought and the Orthodox school of thought,
  • to develop students’ ability to relate Indian methods of argumentation to their own fields of study.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the study, students will be able to -

  • demonstrate knowledge about the nature of Ancient Indian Philosophy,
  • apply the ethical teachings of the Buddha and how to live in their daily life with the guidance of these rules,
  • understand and discuss the basic concepts of the various Indian schools of thoughts,
  • explore the purpose of worshipping the several gods of India.

Module No                 : Phil 2102

Module Name            : Inductive Logic I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-     Logic is the study of sound reasoning and arguments. This course includes some basic principle of induction, different kinds of induction and the value and use of logic. Students will learn how to classify improper and proper induction, how to use criteria for causal determination to define the principle of correct reasoning.

-    The frame of the course takes a base on the following topics;

  1. A Study of the Nature of Induction
  2. Some Subsidiary Processes of Induction
  3. Basic Principles of Induction

   3.1. Law of Uniformity of Nature

   3.2. Law of Causation

  1. Different Kinds of Induction

   4.1. Improper induction

   4.2. Proper induction

       4.2.1. Mill’s method of Scientific Induction – Mill’s five methods.

  1. Some New Theories of Induction (The modern view - Five kinds of induction)
  2. Evaluation of Inductive Reasoning

   6.1. The weakness of simple enumeration

   6.2. The weakness of reasoning by Analogy   

  1. Criteria for causal determination

   7.1. Criteria of Independence

   7.2. Criteria of probable causal laws

  1. The utility of inductive logic for daily life. (For Student -centered Approach)

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help students realize the various kinds of induction,
  • to let them understand a criterion for proper induction,
  • to give them the knowledge of processes subsidiary to induction,
  • to get a better understanding of causation,
  • to enable them to understand the utility of “Inductive Logic”.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the module, students will be able to -

  • apply the ability to think carefully, critically and writing skills which are essential for success in any field of work,
  • reproduce way of thinking in daily life,
  • avoid using fallacies in their daily life.

Module No                 : Phil 2103

Module Name            : Twentieth Century Western philosophy-I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   This course is to encourage the students to detect area of study for a more comprehensive review on the twentieth century western philosophy - I and is an attempt to make an easy way of studying. The students will examine some of the major movements in 20th century western philosophy. Many forms of traditional philosophy continue to hold the interest of 20th century philosophers, and still common of many adherents. The students will know that Pragmatism, a movement of American origin, had deeply influenced intellectual life in Western world. Philosophical analysis has had a great impact though first on the British Empire, and more recently on the other places of the world.

-  The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. The Development of Contemporary philosophy and its General Characteristics
  2. A Study of Bergson's Ontology and Epistemology
  3. A Study of the Pragmatism

3.1. Charles Sanders Peirce   

3.2. William James

3.3. John Dewey   

3.4. Friedrich Schiller

  1. A Study of Logical Positivism

4.1. Alfred Jules Ayer   

4.2. Rudolf Carnap

  1. A Study of Realism

5.1. George Edward Moore   

5.2. Bertrand Russell   

5.3. George Santayana

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help students understand the philosophical movements,
  • to familiarize them with a variety of critiques of the modern conception of things,
  • to enable them to know logical positivism as one of the most famous and important philosophical trends in the present century,
  • to give them the knowledge of different kinds of realism,
  • to acquaint them with the world-famous realists.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the course, students will be able to -

  • use many new and precise methods of analysis extensively,
  • analyze and assess the value of the philosophy,
  • take the required solution to the problem,
  • describe philosophy as the study of the logic of science.

Module No                 : Phil 2104

Module Name            : The Cultural and Ethical Aspects of Environmental Conservation I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-  This course introduces the definition of global environment and the science of ecology. It covers the global environmental issues and the need for ethics of environmental conservation. It deals with the moral determination of natural environment. It also explains the nature and scope of applied ethics and contribution of ethics.

-  The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. Introduction

1.1. What is Environmental Conservation?

1.2. Definition of Key Terms

  1. The need for an ethics of environmental conservation

2.1. The present situation of the World Environment

2.2. The moral dimensions of environmental deterioration and climate change

2.3. The anthropogenic cause of environmental deterioration and climate change

2.4. Prospects for the survival of the human species in the face of environmental  deterioration

  1. Environmental Ethics as a topic of Applied Ethics

3.1. The nature and scope of Applied Ethics

3.2. Contribution of Ethics

3.2.1. Awareness of freedom of human choice

3.2.2. Raises questions of responsibility towards each other and other living beings

3.2.3. Raises questions of responsibility towards the Planet Earth

3.2.4. Raises questions of responsibility to future generation

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to enable students to understand some definitions of environmental philosophy,
  • to help them know the "new holistic ethic" of sustainable development,
  • to make them familiar with Anthropocentricism and some western ecological world view.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the course, students will be able to -

  • know the meaning of environment and ecosystem,
  • become aware of freedom of human choice,
  • discuss the rise question of responsibility to future generation,
  • bring about change in people’s perception and attitude for the conservation of the environment.

Module No.                : Phil 2001

Module Name            : History of Western Intellectual Development-I

  (for English and History Specialization)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-    This module includes from the introduction of philosophy, myth and religion to the great rationalists of Descartes, Spinoza and Leibnitz. This course intends to serve as a furnished guide and reading in the philosophy of west. Students will learn the pre-Socratic period philosophers and the fusion of Platonism and Christianity. Besides, they can learn the new method for the new science and the ideas of great rationalists philosophers.

-    The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. Introduction to the History of Western Intellectual Development
  2. The Greeks and their world

2.1. The Ionian or Milesian School

2.2. The Atomists

2.3. The Sophists (Protagoras)

2.4. Socrates

2.5. Plato

2.6. Aristotle

2.7. The Epicureans and the Stoics (Epicurus)

2.8. Stoicism

  1. Christianity and Philosophy

3.1. The Fusion of Platonism and Christianity (Saint Augustine)

3.2. Medieval Philosophy – The Dark Ages

3.2.1. Boethius (480BC -524 BC)

3.2.2. John Scotus Erigena (approximately AD 810 – AD 8770)

3.2.3. Anselm (11th Century AD)

3.2.4. Peter Abelard (AD 1079 – 1142)

3.2.5. Thomas Aquinas (AD 1225 – 74)

3.2.6. Duns Scotus (   AD 1266 – 1308)

3.2.7. William of Ockham (AD 1285 – 1347)

  1. The Beginning of Scientific Thought

4.1. Niccolo Machiavelli (AD 1469 – 1527)

4.2. Thomas Hobbes (AD 1588 – 1679)

4.3. Francis Bacon (AD 1561 – 1626)

  1. The Beginning of Modern Science
  2. The Great Rationalists

6.1. René Descartes (AD 1596 – 1650)

6.2. Benedict Spinoza (AD 1632 – 1677)

6.3. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (AD 1646 – 1716) 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help students understand the nature of myth and religion,
  • to enable them to be familiar with the thoughts of all the famous Greek philosophers,
  • to make them realize the fusion of Platonism and Christianity,
  • to apprehend the new intellectual approach to knowledge,
  • to help them become familiar with astronomers of modern age.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After learning the module, students will be able to -

  • discuss the nature of myth and religion
  • possess knowledge of how and why philosophy begins and the first philosophical question ‘what is the world made of?
  • contemplate on the Greek philosophy and great rationalists’ philosophy,
  • analyze scientific thought and modern science.

Module No                 : Phil 2002

Module Name            : Ethics of Environmental Conservation-I (for Psychology, Geography Specialization)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-  This course introduces the definition of global Environment and the science of ecology. It covers the Global Environmental issues and the need for Ethics of environmental conservation. It highlights the moral determination of natural environment. It also explains the nature and scope of applied ethics and contribution of ethics.

-  The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. 1. Introduction to the Ethics of Environmental Conservation
  2. Definition of Environmental Philosophy

2.1. A definition of environment

2.2. A definition of ecology

2.3. A definition of biodiversity

2.4. A general definition of Philosophy

  1. What is environmental conservation?

3.1. Definition of environmental conservation and sustainable development

3.2. History of environmental conservation

3.3. Environmental conservation is everybody’s concern

  1. Man and his environment (Western Views and Attitudes)

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to convince students some definition of environmental philosophy,
  • to acquaint them with a brief history of environmentalism,
  • to help them realize and observe environmental ethics and realize sustainable Ethics.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After studying the module, students will be able to -

  • know and extend the meaning of environment and ecosystem,
  • raise awareness of freedom of human choice,
  • discuss the rise question of responsibility to future generation,
  • bring about change in people’s perception and attitude to the conservation of the environment.

Module No                 : Phil 2003

Module Name            : Aesthetics I (for Myanmar and Creative Writing Specialization)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-  Aesthetics is a branch of philosophy concerned with aesthetic experience and the   fundamental principles of art and criticism. This course covers the definition and some of the central theories of western philosophy. Students will learn how a simple exposition of some well-known doctrines given by some philosophers can be used as a solution for aesthetics problems.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. The Nature of Aesthetics

1.1. Art and Aesthetics

  1. Art and Society (Western Theories)
  2. Aesthetics and Art Criticism
  3. A Critical Study of Western Aesthetical Theories

4.1. Plato’s Theory of Art

4.2. Aristotle’s Theory of Art

  1. Modern Aesthetics

5.1. Romantic Movement

5.2. Art for Art’s sake Movement

5.3. Emotionalism:

5.3.1. Veron’s view of art

5.3.2. Collingwood’s view of art

5.3.3. Tolstoy’s view of art

  1. The Dialectic View of Art

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to introduce students the history of aesthetics and the nature of aesthetics,
  • to let them know some western theories of aesthetics,
  • to convince them the imitation theories, art and morality, art and society,
  • to highlight the renaissance art and aesthetics.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After learning the module, students will be able to -

  • analyze the art and aesthetics,
  • classify the various theories of western aesthetic theory,
  • explore the growth of modern aesthetics.

Module No                 : Phil 2004

Module Name            : Philosophy of Law I (for Law Specialization)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   Philosophy of law is a specific subject which studies law from the version of philosophy. This course covers the formulation of concepts and theories, general analysis of law and legal institution and law and morality. Students will learn how to define definition of philosophy and law; how to relate philosophy and law; how to learn the views of some philosophers on law etc. These skills have the nation that citizens have a moral obligation to obey the law.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. Introduction to the Philosophy of Law
  2. The Greek View on Law
  3. Rome Legal Thought
  4. Middle Age and Renaissance
  5. Later Renaissance

5.1. International Law

5.2. Bodin

5.3. Hugo Grotius

  1. Seventeenth to Late Nineteenth Centuries

6.1. Thomas Hobbes and Montesquieu

6.2. Montesquieu

6.3. Kantianism

6.4. Utilitarianism and Positivism

6.5. Hegelianism and the Historical School

6.6. Jhering and German Positivism

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to understand difference between philosophy of law and Jurisprudence,
  • to know the views of some Greek Philosophers on law,
  • to realize the Legal philosophy of Roman philosophers,
  • to be familiar with later Nineteenth century views on law.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the course, students will be able to -

  • explain the term of philosophy of law and Jurisprudence,
  • define the definition of law,
  • discuss the doctrine of social contract,
  • explain philosophy of law may be defined as the abstract science of positive laws.

 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Semester - II

Module No.

Name of Module

Credit Points

Hours Per Week

Lecture

Tutorial

Eng 2002

English  

3

2

2

Phil 2106

Eastern Philosophy-II

4

3

2

Phil 2107

Inductive Logic-II

4

3

2

Phil 2108

Twentieth Century Western Philosophy-II

4

3

2

Elective-I

*

3

2

2

Elective-II

*

3

2

2

 

Total

21

15

12

Total Credits (21)

Total Hours (27)

Foundation Course

Eng 2002       English

Core Courses  

Phil 2106        Eastern Philosophy-II   

Phil 2107        Inductive Logic-II  

Phil 2108        Twentieth Century Western Philosophy-II    

Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization)         

Hist 2004        History of Science and Technology-II

Hist 2005        World History 1900 to Present-II                                                      

Geog 2006      Political Geography-II                                                           

OS 2006          Pāli Language-II

OS 2007          Niti Literature

OS 2008          Pāli Literature (Poetry)

OS 2009          Buddhadassana-II

OS 2010          Buddhist Councils-II

Psy 2004         Stress and Stress Management

Psy 2005         Individual, Social and Cultural Diversity in Pro and Anti-Social Behavior

Psy 2006         Occupational Psychology-II                     &n

3 Third Year (BA)

SEMESTER - I

Module No.

Name of Module

Credit Points

Hours Per Week

Lecture

Tutorial

Eng 3001

English

3

2

2

Phil 3101

Western Aesthetics

4

3

2

Phil 3102

Advanced Logic-I

4

3

2

Phil 3103

Philosophy of History-I

4

3

2

Phil 3104

Myanmar Culture and

Myanmar Ways of Thinking-I

4

3

2

Elective

*

3

2

2

 

Total

22

16

12

 Total Credits (22)

Total Hours (28)

 

Foundation Course                                                                                       

Eng 3001         English

Core Courses                                                                                                 

Phil 3101         Western Aesthetics                            

Phil 3102         Advanced Logic-I                             

Phil 3103         Philosophy of History-I                                 

Phil 3104         Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking-I

Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization)                          

Phil 3105         A Study of Philosophical Texts-I                              

Phil 3106         Ethics-I (Theoretical Ethics)  

Core Course (for Myanmar Studies Specialization)         

MS 3103         Buddhist Culture and Myanmar Traditional Thought

Elective Course (for Other Specializations)**

Phil 3002         Applied Logic and Critical Thinking

Note:  Excerpts from Phil 3104 Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking I for the partial fulfillment of Local Needs.

* A student will have to take one elective.

** It offers to BDevS in recent.

Module No                 : Phil 3101

Module Name            : Western Aesthetics

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   Aesthetics is a branch of philosophy concerned with aesthetic experience and the fundamental principles of art and criticism. This module covers the definition and some of the central theories of Western Philosophy. Students will learn how a simple exposition of some well-known doctrines given by some philosophers can be applied as a solution for Aesthetics problems.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. The Nature of Aesthetics

1.1. The definition of Aesthetics

1.2. The history of Aesthetics

1.3. Art and Aesthetics

1.4. Aesthetics and Art Criticism

  1. Different Kinds of Art Criticism
  2. Art and Society (Western Theories)
  3. A Critical Study of Western Aesthetics

4.1. The Classical Period

4.1.1. Plato’s Theory of Art

4.1.2. Aristotle’s Theory of Art

4.2. The Transitional Period

4.2.1. Leonado da Vinci

4.2.2. Michael Angelo

4.3. The Modern Period

4.3.1. The Growth of Modern Aesthetics

4.3.2. The Romantic Movement

4.3.3. Art for Art’s sake Movement

4.3.4. Emotionalism

4.3.4.1. Eugene Veron

4.3.4.2. R.G.Collingwood

4.3.4.3. Leo Tolstoy

4.3.5. Formalism 

  • Clive Bell

4.3.6. Realism (Representationalism)

4.3.6.1. The Nature and Scope of Realism

4.3.6.2. Nikolai Gavrilovich Chernyshevskii

4.3.6.3. Gustave Courbet

COURSE OBJECTIVE

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to let students, examine the history of Aesthetics and the nature of Aesthetics,
  • to enable them to study the different types of the art criticism,
  • to make them understand some Western Theories,
  • to understand the relationship of ‘Art and Society’
  • to conceived the relation between ‘art and morality’ and ‘art and society’.

LEARNING OUTCOME

At the end of the course, students will be able to -

  • appreciate the beauty of nature and the truth,
  • classify the various theories of Western Aesthetic,
  • apply moment of art and various aesthetic theories to create a better social environment,
  • upgrade their critical thinking, analytical thinking, communicative and writing skill.

Module No                 : Phil 3102

Module Name            : Advanced Logic-I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-    Mathematical (Advanced or Symbolic) logic determines the validity or invalidity of arguments by means of the special technical symbols. This course covers the theory of truth-functions the method of deduction. Student will learn how to use methods that are easier and shorter than the method of truth table, how to determine the truth-value of the components, how to develop the method of analyzing, symbolizing and establishing the proofs of validity or invalidity of arguments. These will have knowledge enough to answer any exercise in the truth-functional logic.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. A Brief History of Logic
  2. Truth Functional Logic

2.1. Simple and Compound Statements

2.1.1. Conjunction

2.1.2. Negation

2.1.3. Disjunction

2.2. The Nature of Implication

2.3. Argument Forms and Truth Tables    

2.4. Truth-value Analyses

2.4.1. Matrix Method

2.4.2. Quine's Method

1.4.3. Polish Method        

2.5. Tautologies, Contradictions and Contingencies

2.6. Material Equivalences

2.7. Testing Implications and Equivalences by Quine's Method

  1. The method of deduction

3.1. Formal Proof of validity

3.1.1. Nine Rules of Inference           

3.1.2. Ten Rules of Replacement

3.2. Incompleteness of the Nineteen Rules

3.3. The Rules of Conditional Proof

3.4. The Rule of Indirect Proof

3.5. Proof of Tautologies

3.6. Proving Invalidity

3.7. Shorter Truth Table Technique (Reductio ad Absurdum Method)

3.8. The Strengthened Rule of Conditional Proof

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help them understand the different methods of truth-value analysis,
  • to enable them to apply truth-value analysis methods to the logical problems,
  • to let them thoroughly understand what the method of deduction and its advantages are,
  • to acquaint them with the nineteen valid rules of inference and their proofs of validity.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After this study, students will be able to -

  • practice the method of advanced logic that will give the correct methods of reasoning,
  • apply the ability of distinguishing validity of argument for effectiveness in their daily life,
  • analyze logical propositions and truth tables to solve the problems.

Module No                 : Phil 3103

Module Name            : Philosophy of History-I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   Philosophy of history is a study of history from the philosophical point of view. It explores into the historical facts, statements, explanation, etc. This module covers some basic rules, concept and skill of philosophy of history. Students will learn how many branches of philosophy of history; how to do better for the future generation from past humans’ happenings and experiences presented by historian. These skills have lifelong benefits for improving one’s thinking and critical assessment of historical evident.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. The Nature of Philosophy of History
  2. A Philosophical Study of Historical Problems

2.1. History and Science

2.2. Historical explanation

2.3. Truth and fact in history

2.4. The notion of objectivity in history

2.5. Determinism and Freedom in history

  1. A study of some nineteenth century historical theories

3.1. Kant’s conception of history

3.2. Herder’s conception of history

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help students understand the meaning and development of philosophy of history,
  • to enable them to understand the meaning of determinism and freedom in history,
  • to familiarize them with some nineteenth century historical theories.

LEARNING OUTCOME

After completion of the study, students will be able to -

  • explain all significant historical changes are determined by geographical or biological causes,
  • apply theory of some historians to the social, cultural and political development of man,
  • realize the philosophy of history is important role of in building a better society.

Module No                 : Phil 3104

Module Name            : Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking - I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

 -   Myanmar culture and Myanmar ideas come under the influence of the Buddha, so if you want to learn about the Myanmar way of life and the Myanmar people, you need to know about Buddhism. This module covers some basic concepts, rules and ways of thing of Myanmar peoples. Students will learn how Myanmar people have developed Myanmar culture and literature; what kind of thinking they practice; how knowledge is accepted and how they follow the rules and responsibilities.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. Nature and Definition of Myanmar Culture

1.1. The influence of Buddhism on Myanmar Thought

1.2. Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Literature

  1. Nature of Myanmar Way of Thinking
  2. Philosophical impact on Myanmar Traditional Festival
  3. Myanmar Thought on Reality

4.1. Process as Reality

4.2. Concept of Mind

4.3. Concept of Matter

  1. Myanmar Thought on Knowledge

5.1. Process of Cognition

5.2. Experience and Reason

  1. Myanmar Thought on Morality

6.1. Good and Evil

6.2. Duty

6.3. Justice

  1. Myanmar Proverbs and Categories of Dialectic Method

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to enable students to understand the essence of Myanmar culture and Myanmar ways of thinking,
  • to help them realize the role of Buddhism in Myanmar literature,
  • to let them explore into the concept of mind, matter in Myanmar traditional thought,
  • to help them realize Myanmar traditional views on knowledge,
  • to give them understanding of the traditional views on duty in Myanmar thought.

LEARNING OUTCOME

After completion of the study, students will be able to -

  • apply Myanmar culture, Myanmar literature, Myanmar ideas to their daily social interaction,
  • develop their thinking skills by studying the topic of Categories of Dialectic Method in Myanmar Proverbs.

Module No: Phil 3105

Module Name: A Study of Philosophical Texts-I

  1. Selection from Ancient Western philosophers

1.1. Heraclitus       

1.2. Plato     

1.3. Aristotle

  1. Selection from Modern Western Philosophers

2.1. René Descartes                       

2.2. David Hume   

2.3. Immanuel Kant           

2.4. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel 

  1. Selection from Contemporary Western Philosophers

3.1. Friedrich Nietzsche    

3.2. William James 

3.3. Bertrand Russell         

3.4. Alfred Jules Ayer 

3.5. John Rawls

Module No                 : Phil 3106

Module Name            : Ethics - I (Theoretical Ethics)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   This module mainly includes four units and students will learn thoroughly to obtain the knowledge of the Ethics of Western and Eastern philosophers. As Ethics is the philosophical study of morals, it is the necessity for all human beings. The students will study how to be familiar with the Theoretical Ethics and better understand it. They will also learn how to choose the important principles and facts of the course.

-   The frame of the course is based on the topics mentioned below;

  1. The Nature and Scope of Ethics

1.1. Ethics and the Ideas of Value                                                            

1.2. Ethics and Philosophy                        

1.3. Ethics and Morality                

1.4. The Role of Ethics as Moral Philosophy in Today’s World   

  1. The Fundamental Concepts of Ethical Problems

2.1. The ‘Is’ and the ‘Ought’                                

2.2. The ‘Absolute’ and the ‘Relative’

2.3. The ‘Subjective’ and the ‘Objective’

2.4. The ‘Formal’ and the ‘Teleological’   

2.5. The ‘Egoistic’ and the ‘Altruistic’

2.6. ‘Freedom’ and ‘Moral Responsibility’

2.7. ‘Right’ and ‘Duty’                 

  1. A General Study of Some Western Ethical Theories

3.1. Ancient Greek Ethics             

3.2. Utilitarian Ethics                                                        

3.3. Sociological Ethics

3.4. Evolutionary Ethics

3.5. Kantian Ethics            

3.6. The Ethics of G.E. Moore (cognitivism / nonnaturalism)

3.7. The Ethical View of John Dewey (naturalism)

3.8. The Ethical View of A. J. Ayer (emotivism / noncognitivism)

3.9. Existentialist Ethics    

  1. A General Study of Some Eastern Ethical Theories

4.1. Indian Ethics  

4.1.1. The Ethics of Bhagavadgita

4.1.2. Carvaka’s Hedonism   

4.1.3. Buddhist Ethics

4.2. Chinese Ethics

4.2.1. The Confucian Ethics

4.2.2. The Taoist Ethics

4.2.3. The Ethical View of Mo Tzu

4.3. Japanese Ethics

4.3.1. The Ethical View of Nishida Kitarō

4.3.2. The Ethical View of Watsuji Tetsurō

4.3.3. The Ethical View of Tominaga Nakamoto

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this module are -

  • to acquaint students with the nature and scope of Ethics,
  • to help them understand Ethics, the Ideas of value, Ethics and Philosophy,
  • to make them fully understand Ethics and Morality,
  • to enable them to know role of Ethics as Moral Philosophy in today’s world.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the course, students will be able to -

  • explain the intimate relationship between Ethics and Morality,
  • examine the moral rules and regulations, moral values, norms, ideals and patterns,
  • analyze the doubts about what would be the right thing to do or which course of action to be chosen, from a multiple choice of actions or when courses of action to be chosen are in conflict or incompatible,
  • describe the problems of humanitarianism discussed by many scholars from different points of view,
  • distinguish between what is ‘is’ and what is ‘ought’.

Module No : MS 3103

Module Name : Buddhist Culture and Myanmar Traditional Thought

(FOR Myanmar Studies Specialization)

  1. Introducing Buddhist Culture and the essence of Buddhism

1.1. The life of Buddha

1.2. Four Noble Truth

1.3. To Abstain from the Extreme and to practice the Right Way

1.4. Straightening One’s view

  1. The Concept of Reality

2.1. Concept of Reality in Myanmar Traditional Thought

2.2. The Ledi Sayadaw exponds a system on the world under three headings

2.3. Law of Causation

2.4. Acceptance of Nibbana

2.5. Myanmar Proverbs

  1. The Concept of Knowledge in Myanmar Traditional Thought

3.1. The Nature of Epistemology

3.2. Sources and Origin of Knowledge

3.3. Wisdom and Knowledge

3.4. The Process of Knowledge in Ledi Sayadaw

3.5. The Role of “Intuition” in Myanmar Thought

3.6. The Concept of Wisdom in Myanmar Traditional Thought

  1. Law of Change

4.1. Problem of Change

4.2. Change as Unreal

4.3. Change as Real

4.4. Modern Philosophers’ Views

4.5. Myanmar Philosophical Thought on Change

  1. Sociology

5.1. Social Philosophy

5.2. Concept of Society in Myanmar Traditional Thought

5.3. Human Nature in Myanmar Traditional Thought

5.4. The Relationship between Individual and Society

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

SEMESTER - II

Module No.

Name of Module

Credit Points

Hours Per Week

Lecture

Tutorial

Eng 3002

English

3

2

2

Phil 3107

Eastern Aesthetics

4

3

2

Phil 3108

Advanced Logic-II

4

3

2

Phil 3109

Philosophy of History-II

4

3

2

Phil 3110

Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking-II

4

3

2

Elective

*

3

2

2

 

Total

22

16

12

Total Credits (22)

Total Hours (28)

 

Foundation Course                          

Eng 3002         English                                   

Core Courses                                    

Phil 3107         Eastern Aesthetics                             

Phil 3108         Advanced Logic-II                            

Phil 3109         Philosophy of History-II                                

Phil 3110         Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking - II

Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization)                          

Phil 3111         A Study of Philosophical Texts - II                           

Phil 3112         Ethics-II (Applied Ethics)                                                                      

Note: Excerpts from Phil. 3110 Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking II for the partial fulfillment of Local Needs.

* A student will have to take one elective. 

Module No                 : Phil 3107

Module Name            : Eastern Aesthetics

COURSE OBJECTIVE

-   Aesthetics is a study of art from the philosophical point of view. This module covers the Indian Aesthetics, Chinese Aesthetics, Japanese Aesthetics and Myanmar Aesthetics. Students will learn how to identify the Indian Aesthetics, Chinese Aesthetics, Japanese Aesthetics and Myanmar Aesthetics; how artists and philosophers interpret Rasa in different ways etc. These skills will give students appreciation of traditional music, song, dance and custom. And then they will come to love nature and understand the environmental conservation and sustainable development.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. A Study of Some Eastern Aesthetics

1.1. Indian Aesthetics

1.2. Chinese Aesthetics

1.3. Japanese Aesthetics

  1. Myanmar Aesthetics

2.1. Introduction to Myanmar Aesthetics

2.2. Zayya’s View on Art                

2.3. Zawgyi’s View on Art

2.4. Dagon Taryar’s View on Art     

2.5. Letwae Minnyo’s View on Art

2.6. Min Thu Wun’s View on Art

2.7. Shwe Don B Aung’s View on Film

2.8. Director U Thu Kha’s View on Film and Art

2.9. Bagyi Aung Soe’s View on Art

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help them understand the term rasa and its important role in Aesthetics,
  • to enable them to understand the relation between Art and philosophy in Chinese Culture,
  • to help them realize a key to understand the Japanese culture,
  • to enthuse them to appreciate the true nature of traditional art of Myanmar artists,
  • to help them realize the relation of the artistic ideas of Myanmar scholars and art works.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After completion of study, students will be able to -

  • love the nature and traditional culture,
  • upgrade their skill of discussion, creative, communicative and presentation,
  • <span style=\
4 Fourth Year (BA)

SEMESTER - I

Module No.

Name of Module

Credit Points

Hours Per Week

Lecture

Tutorial

Phil 4101

Philosophy of Religion-I

4

3

2

Phil 4102

Problems of Philosophy-I

4

3

2

Phil 4104

Research Methodology in Philosophy-I

4

3

2

Phil 4105

Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy-I

4

3

2

Phil 4106

Political Philosophy (West)

4

3

2

Elective

 

3

2

2

 

Total

23

17

12

Total Credits (23)

Total Hours (29)

 

Core Courses                                    

Phil 4101         Philosophy of Religion-I                                

Phil 4102         Problems of Philosophy-I                              

Phil 4104         Research Methodology in Philosophy-I

Phil 4105         Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy-I

Phil 4106         Political Philosophy (West)

Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization)

Phil 4103         Philosophy of Science-I

Phil 4113         Philosophy of Language-I     

Core Course (for Myanmar Studies Specialization)         

MS 4104         A Study of Myanmar Moral Principles

* A student will have to take one elective.

Module No.                : Phil 4101

Module Name            : Philosophy of Religion-I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-    Philosophy of religion is a philosophical reflection on religion. This module covers four great religions of the world and essential characteristics of these religions. Students will learn how to define the philosophy of religion; how to analyze the religion and Theology, religion and problem of evils; how to examine the problem with religious concept and languages.

-    The frame of the course is based on the topics mentioned below;

  1. Introduction to Philosophy of Religion
  2. Approaches to Philosophy of Religion
  3. The Four Religions of the World and their Philosophical Trends
  4. Analytical Study of Philosophy of Religion
  5. The Critical Examination of the Philosophy of Religion

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this module are -

  • to demonstrate the four kinds of world religion,
  • to discuss the philosophy of religion,
  • to help them understand the respective philosophers’ views on religion,
  • to explain the nature of religion,
  • to distinguish philosophy of religion and theology.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After studying the module, students will be able to -

  • explain the philosophy of religion,
  • examine the four kinds of world religion, and deeply understand the essence of each religion.
  • analyze the religion and Theology, religion and problem of evils,
  • examine the problems with religious concept and languages,

Module No.                : Phil 4102

Module Name            : Problems of Philosophy – I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   Problems of philosophy are the study of philosophical inquiry, both of science and in everyday life. This module covers the nature of philosophical problem, the problem concerning the origin and source of knowledge and some epistemological problems. Students will learn how the daily life problem is different from the philosophical problems; how to apply theory of the problem to solve the daily life problems.

-    The frame of the course is based on the topics mentioned below;

  1. The Nature of Philosophical Problems
  2. A Study of Some Epistemological Problems

2.1. The Problem Concerning the Origin and Source of Knowledge

2.1.1. Reason versus Perception

2.1.2. Intuition

2.1.3. Testimony

2.2. Problem of Truth

2.2.1. The Correspondence Theory

2.2.2. The Coherence Theory

2.2.3. The Pragmatic Theory

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to enable students, understand the nature of philosophical inquiry and its values,
  • to help them solve the philosophical issues from the daily life problem,
  • to let them study the problems of the origin and sources of knowledge,
  • to enable them differentiate between reason and perception,
  • to give them the understanding of the nature and solutions of the problem of truth.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After completion of the module, students will be able to -

  • analyze the daily life problem from the philosophical problem,
  • explain the problem of philosophy which is an important role to solve the social problem,
  • verify the correctness of their knowledge and beliefs with theory of truth.
  • apply theory of the problem to solve the daily life problems.

Module No.                : Phil 4104

Module Name            : Research Methodology in Philosophy - I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-  Research methodology is the specific procedures or techniques used to identify, select, process, and analyze information about a topic. This module covers some research methods, research problems and research principles. Students will learn how to acknowledge the characteristics of truth research; how to identify quantitative and qualitative research; how to study the ways of thinking and rule of strategy etc. These skills have better understand published works, ways of balance collaborative and individual work; determine an area of interest, and jump start their careers as researchers.

-    The frame of the course is based on the topics of;

  1. The Nature and Role of Research in Conceptual Learning
  2. A General Study of Research Methodology

2.1. Research Problem        

2.2. Research Hypothesis            

2.3. Research Methods         

2.4. Research Finding        

2.5. Research Principle                

2.6. Contribution

2.7. Definitions of Key words

  1. Ways of Thinking and Research Methodology

    - Methods of Thinking

  1. What is a Research Problem?

    - Data Collection and Literature Review

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to enable students, understand the characteristics of truth research,
  • to empower them with knowledge of research methodology,
  • to let them get the knowledge of writing philosophical papers,
  • to make them realize the typical organizational pattern for research paper,
  • to become familiar with the literature survey.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After completion of the module, students will be able to -

  • upgrade their skills of data analyzing,
  • carry out research or project on their own,
  • apply the research methods with a logical flow of thought in daily life.

Module No.                : Phil 4105

Module Name            : Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy – I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

- This module is to explain the background of Indian thought and the outstanding Indian Philosophers’ views. The students will learn twentieth century Indian philosophy as “interpretative and not creative”. It does not need any argument to show that “interpretation” and “creative thinking” are not completely exclusive of each other. They will study that twentieth century Indian thinkers also try to re-interpret some of the ancient ideas derived chiefly from the Upanisads. Furthermore, the twentieth century Indian thinkers acknowledge the reality of suffering and the possibility of an escape from it and yet they approach the problems in different ways.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. A Brief Study of the Background of Indian Thought
  2. A Critical Study of the Outstanding Indian Philosophers’ views

2.1. The Philosophy of S. Radhakrishnan

2.2. The Philosophy of Sri Aurobindo

2.3. The Philosophy of Rabindranath Tagore

2.4. The Philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to accept the reality of the world and also of the bodily aspect of man,
  • to help students know that the twentieth century Indian thinkers are very faithful to the tradition of philosophy,
  • to show that the twentieth century Indian thinkers are still struggling with the same old problems,
  • to regard that the twentieth century Indian thinkers, believe philosophy as essentially tied up with up,
  • to become acquainted with the world-famous Indian thinkers.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After completion of this module, students will be able to -

  • realize that philosophy is an attitude-a way of looking at things,
  • apply philosophical knowledge that can adopt an entirely different perspective from the one that we normally adopt,
  • divide by man’s own inner power and decisions,
  • comprehend Gandhi’s non-violence, Satyāgraha, which had succeeded in solving smaller problems of life, could also be effectively used for solving greater problems like, ‘political slavery’.

Module No.                : Phil 4106

Module Name            : Political Philosophy (West)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   The Political philosophy is a sub-subject of philosophy. This module covers the nature of political thought; essential political concepts; Political thought of medieval and Modern philosophers and recently political thought etc. Students will learn how political thought is related to science, philosophy, ethics, religion, economic theory and literature or traditional doctrines and superstitions; how western political theory is valuable also as an aid to the interpretation of history.

  • The frame of the module is based on the topics mentioned below;
  1. Introduction
  2. Essential Political Concepts
  3. Ancient Greek and Roman Political Institutions and Political Philosophy
  4. Medieval Political Philosophy
  • Machiavelli
  1. Modern Political Philosophies
  2. Social Contract Theories
  3. Political Theories of the French Revolution
  4. Political Philosophy of Adam Smith and Malthus
  5. Marxist Political Thought
  6. Recent Political Thoughts

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help students know political thoughts and political institutions,
  • to understand Nature of Greek Political Thought,
  • to perceive Roman theories of law and distinct thoughts,
  • to recognize the changes of political Thoughts under the close Middle Ages,
  • to help them understand the modern theory of sovereignty,
  • to enable them to appreciate the social contract theories,
  • to make them comprehend Recent Political Theory.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After studying the module, students will be able to -

  • apply the political theory to for the development of the state,
  • demonstrate the understanding of the Western Political institutions,
  • discuss the strengths and weakness of National Socialism, Anarchism, Syndicalism,

Guild socialism, Racism, Fascism and Despotism.

SYLLABUS OF ELECTIVE COURSES

(FOR PHILOSOPHY SPECIALIZATION)

Module No.                : Phil 4103

Module Name            : Philosophy of Science-I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-      ThisModuleintroduces the nature and history of science. It states a brief study of the development of science and technology from Greek to contemporary time. It introduces to the Logic and methodology of science. It also illustrates the nature of scientific inference and the nature of hypothesis and explanation.

-      The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. Introduction to the nature and history of science

1.1. The Nature of Science

1.2. The History of Science

  1. A brief study of the development of science and technology from Greek to Contemporary times
  2. Introduction to the Logic and Methodology of Science

3.1. The Nature of Scientific Inference

3.2. The Nature of Hypothesis and Explanation

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to familiarize students with the philosophy of science,
  • to critically analyze the methodology of science,
  • to identify that science is an activity in the explanation, prediction and control of empirical phenomena in a rational manner.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On completion of the study, students will be able to -

  • track the basic structure of science and the connection between science and philosophy,
  • apply the methods of science,
  • analyze what hypothesis is and Wisdom’s view on hypothesis,
  • describe the concept of space and time.

Module No.:   Phil 4113

Module Name: Philosophy of Language-I

  1. Introduction to Philosophy of Language

1.1. Philosophy and Language

1.2. Language and Thought

1.3. Nature, Function and Scope of Philosophy of Language

  1. Western Philosophical Perspectives on Language

2.1. Ancient Greek

        2.1.1. Plato

        2.1.2. Aristotle

2.2. Early Modern Period

        John Locke

  1. The Linguistic Turn of Western Philosophy

3.1. Gottlob Frege

3.2. Bertrand Russell

3.3. Ludwig Wittgenstein

3.4. Ferdinand de Saussure

3.5. George Edward Moore

3.6. Moritz Schlick

3.7. Lev Vygotsky

3.8. Rudolph Carnap

3.9. A. J. Ayer

3.10. Alfred Tarski

3.11. J. L. Austin

3.12. Gilbert Ryle

3.13. Noam Chomsky

  1. Structuralism, Postmodernism and Deconstructionism

4.1. Claude Levi-Strauss

4.2. Michel Foucault

4.3. Jacques Derrida

SYLLABUS of CORE Course FOR OTHER SPECIALIZATION

(FOR MYANMAR STUDIES SPECIALIZATION)

Module No.:   MS 4104

Module Name: A Study of Myanmar Moral Principles

  1. A Study of Causal Relation

1.1. The Definition of the Law of Causation

1.2. The Causal Relation

1.3. The Law of Kamma

1.4. Law of Causation (12 Links)

  1. 2. Myanmar Thought on Morality

2.1. Good and Evil

2.2. Duty

2.3. Justice

  1. Ethical Views in Myanmar Thought

3.1. The View of Good Action

3.2. The Four Cardinal Values

3.3. Thingaza Sayadaw’s View on Duty

3.4. The Characteristics of the Good Man

3.5. The Characteristics of the Wise Person

3.6. The Characteristics of an Ignorant Person

3.6.1. The Characteristics of the bad and foolish man from Lokaniti

3.6.2. The Concept of bad man according to Dhammapada

3.7.   Wisdom as a guide to a good life

3.8.   To Abstain from the Extremes and to practice the Right Way

3.9.   The Way of Mingala Sutta

3.10. The Value of Good

3.11. The Benefits of Mangala Sutta

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

SEMESTER - II

Module No.

Name of Module

Credit Points

Hours Per Week

Lecture

Tutorial

Phil 4107

Philosophy of Religion-II

4

3

2

Phil 4108

Problems of Philosophy-II

4

3

2

Phil 4110

Research Methodology in Philosophy-II

4

3

2

Phil 4111

Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy-II

4

3

2

Phil 4112

Political Philosophy (East)

4

3

2

Elective

 

3

2

2

 

Total

23

17

12

Total Credits (23)

Total Hours (29)

 

Core Courses                                    

Phil 4107         Philosophy of Religion-II                              

Phil 4108         Problems of Philosophy-II                 

Phil 4110         Research Methodology in Philosophy-II

Phil 4111         Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy-II     

Phil 4112         Political Philosophy (East)

**Phil 4110 (Research Methodology in Philosophy-II) အတွက် Tutorial (၂၀)မှတ်နေရာတွင် Field Trip မှရရှိသော data collection ပေါ်အခြေခံ၍ Field Report တင်စေပြီးလျှင် အမှတ် (၂၀) ကို အစားထိုးပေးရပါမည်။ (BoS Meeting 2/2017) ဆုံဖြတ်ချက်ဖြင့်အတည်ပြပြီး ဖြစ်သည်။

Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization)

Phil 4109         Philosophy of Science-II

Phil 4114         Philosophy of Language-II

Note:  A student will have to take one elective.

မှတ်ချက်။         ။ BA နောက်ဆုံးနှစ်ကျောင်းသား၊ ကျောင်းသူများသည် Term Paper/Project Paper တင်သွင်းခြင်းကို ဒုတိယနှစ်ဝက်စာမေးပွဲမဖြေဆိုခင် (၂)ပတ်အလို နောက်ဆုံးထား၍ BA ဘွဲ့ရရှိရန် လိုအပ်ချက်တစ်ရပ် အနေဖြင့် မဖြစ်မနေ ဆောင်ရွက်ရပါမည်။

Module No.                : Phil 4107

Module Name            : Philosophy of Religion-II

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   Philosophy of religion involves all the main areas of philosophy: metaphysics, epistemology, and value theory, philosophy of language, science, history, politics, art, and so on. This module covers the development of religion to various concerns view on the ultimate reality of all religion. Students will learn how Students will learn how to the origin and development of religions came into being; how to relate the man and religion, philosophy and morality etc.

The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. History and Philosophy of Religion
  2. History of Buddhism
  3. Buddhism as Philosophy and Buddhism as Religion
  4. A Comparative Study of Religion
  5. The Critical Examination of Philosophy of Religion

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to have students learn about origin and development of religion,
  • to help understand the difference between religion and philosophy of religion,
  • to make them fully understand the essence and doctrine of Buddhism,
  • to show the contribution of philosophy of religion for religion and philosophy,
  • to criticize philosophy of religion.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After studying the module, students will be able to -

  • explain main purpose of all religion and to find out their liberation from physical and mental suffering,
  • practice for the development of concentration and wisdom used in the noble eightfold parts,
  • discuss that the ultimate concern of different religions.

Module No.                : Phil 4108

Module Name            : Problems of Philosophy-II

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   Problems of philosophy are the study of philosophical inquiry, both of science and in everyday life. This course covers the ontology and ontological problems, the concept of substance and the problems of human nature in some philosophers. Students will learn how to recognize the reality of being and becoming; what is the problem of substance, how to realize the nature of man.

-   The frame of the course is based on the topics mentioned below;

  1. A Study of Ontological problems

1.1. The problem of Being and Becoming

1.2. The problem of Substance

  1. Ethical problem

2.1. The problem of human nature

2.2. The problem of Individual and society

2.3. The problem of human freedom and determinism

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help students understand the meaning of ontology and the problem of Being and

      Becoming,

  • to enable them to learn the characteristics of materialism and idealism,
  • to let them try to solve the problems of human nature and the problem between individual

and society

  • to let them learn about freedom and determinism.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the module, students will be able to -

  • reproduce and apply the ways of thinking in daily life,
  • analyze the specific issues of daily life,
  • upgrade their social relation,
  • solve social problems in daily life.

Module No.                : Phil 4110

Module Name            : Research Methodology in Philosophy-II

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-    Research methodology is the specific procedure or techniques used to identify, select, process, and analyze information about a topic. This course covers the writing of an abstract, journal article, academic writing and copyright law. Students will learn how to write an abstract; how to insert source notes; how to mention bibliography, diagrams, illustration when they write their term paper as well as research paper. These skills have benefits for academic paper writing.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. The Writing of an Abstract
  2. The Entry of Notes, Bibliography, Diagrams, Illustration, Contents
  3. Principles of Usage (Words, Citation, etc)
  4. Ethical Consideration

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to familiarize students with different kinds of abstract,
  • to help them to understand bibliographies, references, endnotes, footnotes, attribution and acknowledgement,
  • to enable them to understand language focus citations and tense,
  • to accept plagiarism not only as legal wrong but also as moral wrong.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After studying the module, students will be able to -

  • write an abstract, notes, bibliography which are the necessities of academic writing, term paper or thesis writing skills,
  • apply research methodology to their research.

Module No.                : Phil 4111

Module Name          

5 First Year (Honours)

SEMESTER - I

Module No.

Name of Module

Credit Points

Hours Per Week

Lecture

Tutorial

Eng 3001

English

3

2

2

Phil 3101

Western Aesthetics

4

3

2

Phil 3102

Advanced Logic-I

4

3

2

Phil 3103

Philosophy of History-I

4

3

2

Phil 3104

Myanmar Culture and

Myanmar Ways of Thinking-I

4

3

2

Elective

*

3

2

2

 

Total

22

16

12

 Total Credits (22)

Total Hours (28)

 

Foundation Course                                                                                       

Eng 3001         English

Core Courses                                                                                                 

Phil 3101         Western Aesthetics                            

Phil 3102         Advanced Logic-I                             

Phil 3103         Philosophy of History-I                                 

Phil 3104         Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking-I

Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization)                          

Phil 3105         A Study of Philosophical Texts-I                              

Phil 3106         Ethics-I (Theoretical Ethics)  

Core Course (for Myanmar Studies Specialization)         

MS 3103         Buddhist Culture and Myanmar Traditional Thought

Elective Course (for Other Specializations)**

Phil 3002         Applied Logic and Critical Thinking

Note:  Excerpts from Phil 3104 Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking I for the partial fulfillment of Local Needs.

* A student will have to take one elective.

** It offers to BDevS in recent.

Module No                 : Phil 3101

Module Name            : Western Aesthetics

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   Aesthetics is a branch of philosophy concerned with aesthetic experience and the fundamental principles of art and criticism. This module covers the definition and some of the central theories of Western Philosophy. Students will learn how a simple exposition of some well-known doctrines given by some philosophers can be applied as a solution for Aesthetics problems.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. The Nature of Aesthetics

1.1. The definition of Aesthetics

1.2. The history of Aesthetics

1.3. Art and Aesthetics

1.4. Aesthetics and Art Criticism

  1. Different Kinds of Art Criticism
  2. Art and Society (Western Theories)
  3. A Critical Study of Western Aesthetics

4.1. The Classical Period

4.1.1. Plato’s Theory of Art

4.1.2. Aristotle’s Theory of Art

4.2. The Transitional Period

4.2.1. Leonado da Vinci

4.2.2. Michael Angelo

4.3. The Modern Period

4.3.1. The Growth of Modern Aesthetics

4.3.2. The Romantic Movement

4.3.3. Art for Art’s sake Movement

4.3.4. Emotionalism

4.3.4.1. Eugene Veron

4.3.4.2. R.G.Collingwood

4.3.4.3. Leo Tolstoy

4.3.5. Formalism 

  • Clive Bell

4.3.6. Realism (Representationalism)

4.3.6.1. The Nature and Scope of Realism

4.3.6.2. Nikolai Gavrilovich Chernyshevskii

4.3.6.3. Gustave Courbet

COURSE OBJECTIVE

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to let students, examine the history of Aesthetics and the nature of Aesthetics,
  • to enable them to study the different types of the art criticism,
  • to make them understand some Western Theories,
  • to understand the relationship of ‘Art and Society’
  • to conceived the relation between ‘art and morality’ and ‘art and society’.

LEARNING OUTCOME

At the end of the course, students will be able to -

  • appreciate the beauty of nature and the truth,
  • classify the various theories of Western Aesthetic,
  • apply moment of art and various aesthetic theories to create a better social environment,
  • upgrade their critical thinking, analytical thinking, communicative and writing skill.

Module No                 : Phil 3102

Module Name            : Advanced Logic-I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-    Mathematical (Advanced or Symbolic) logic determines the validity or invalidity of arguments by means of the special technical symbols. This course covers the theory of truth-functions the method of deduction. Student will learn how to use methods that are easier and shorter than the method of truth table, how to determine the truth-value of the components, how to develop the method of analyzing, symbolizing and establishing the proofs of validity or invalidity of arguments. These will have knowledge enough to answer any exercise in the truth-functional logic.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. A Brief History of Logic
  2. Truth Functional Logic

2.1. Simple and Compound Statements

2.1.1. Conjunction

2.1.2. Negation

2.1.3. Disjunction

2.2. The Nature of Implication

2.3. Argument Forms and Truth Tables    

2.4. Truth-value Analyses

2.4.1. Matrix Method

2.4.2. Quine's Method

1.4.3. Polish Method        

2.5. Tautologies, Contradictions and Contingencies

2.6. Material Equivalences

2.7. Testing Implications and Equivalences by Quine's Method

  1. The method of deduction

3.1. Formal Proof of validity

3.1.1. Nine Rules of Inference           

3.1.2. Ten Rules of Replacement

3.2. Incompleteness of the Nineteen Rules

3.3. The Rules of Conditional Proof

3.4. The Rule of Indirect Proof

3.5. Proof of Tautologies

3.6. Proving Invalidity

3.7. Shorter Truth Table Technique (Reductio ad Absurdum Method)

3.8. The Strengthened Rule of Conditional Proof

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help them understand the different methods of truth-value analysis,
  • to enable them to apply truth-value analysis methods to the logical problems,
  • to let them thoroughly understand what the method of deduction and its advantages are,
  • to acquaint them with the nineteen valid rules of inference and their proofs of validity.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After this study, students will be able to -

  • practice the method of advanced logic that will give the correct methods of reasoning,
  • apply the ability of distinguishing validity of argument for effectiveness in their daily life,
  • analyze logical propositions and truth tables to solve the problems.

Module No                 : Phil 3103

Module Name            : Philosophy of History-I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   Philosophy of history is a study of history from the philosophical point of view. It explores into the historical facts, statements, explanation, etc. This module covers some basic rules, concept and skill of philosophy of history. Students will learn how many branches of philosophy of history; how to do better for the future generation from past humans’ happenings and experiences presented by historian. These skills have lifelong benefits for improving one’s thinking and critical assessment of historical evident.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. The Nature of Philosophy of History
  2. A Philosophical Study of Historical Problems

2.1. History and Science

2.2. Historical explanation

2.3. Truth and fact in history

2.4. The notion of objectivity in history

2.5. Determinism and Freedom in history

  1. A study of some nineteenth century historical theories

3.1. Kant’s conception of history

3.2. Herder’s conception of history

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help students understand the meaning and development of philosophy of history,
  • to enable them to understand the meaning of determinism and freedom in history,
  • to familiarize them with some nineteenth century historical theories.

LEARNING OUTCOME

After completion of the study, students will be able to -

  • explain all significant historical changes are determined by geographical or biological causes,
  • apply theory of some historians to the social, cultural and political development of man,
  • realize the philosophy of history is important role of in building a better society.

Module No                 : Phil 3104

Module Name            : Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking - I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

 -   Myanmar culture and Myanmar ideas come under the influence of the Buddha, so if you want to learn about the Myanmar way of life and the Myanmar people, you need to know about Buddhism. This module covers some basic concepts, rules and ways of thing of Myanmar peoples. Students will learn how Myanmar people have developed Myanmar culture and literature; what kind of thinking they practice; how knowledge is accepted and how they follow the rules and responsibilities.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. Nature and Definition of Myanmar Culture

1.1. The influence of Buddhism on Myanmar Thought

1.2. Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Literature

  1. Nature of Myanmar Way of Thinking
  2. Philosophical impact on Myanmar Traditional Festival
  3. Myanmar Thought on Reality

4.1. Process as Reality

4.2. Concept of Mind

4.3. Concept of Matter

  1. Myanmar Thought on Knowledge

5.1. Process of Cognition

5.2. Experience and Reason

  1. Myanmar Thought on Morality

6.1. Good and Evil

6.2. Duty

6.3. Justice

  1. Myanmar Proverbs and Categories of Dialectic Method

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to enable students to understand the essence of Myanmar culture and Myanmar ways of thinking,
  • to help them realize the role of Buddhism in Myanmar literature,
  • to let them explore into the concept of mind, matter in Myanmar traditional thought,
  • to help them realize Myanmar traditional views on knowledge,
  • to give them understanding of the traditional views on duty in Myanmar thought.

LEARNING OUTCOME

After completion of the study, students will be able to -

  • apply Myanmar culture, Myanmar literature, Myanmar ideas to their daily social interaction,
  • develop their thinking skills by studying the topic of Categories of Dialectic Method in Myanmar Proverbs.

Module No: Phil 3105

Module Name: A Study of Philosophical Texts-I

  1. Selection from Ancient Western philosophers

1.1. Heraclitus       

1.2. Plato     

1.3. Aristotle

  1. Selection from Modern Western Philosophers

2.1. René Descartes                       

2.2. David Hume   

2.3. Immanuel Kant           

2.4. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel 

  1. Selection from Contemporary Western Philosophers

3.1. Friedrich Nietzsche    

3.2. William James 

3.3. Bertrand Russell         

3.4. Alfred Jules Ayer 

3.5. John Rawls

Module No                 : Phil 3106

Module Name            : Ethics - I (Theoretical Ethics)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   This module mainly includes four units and students will learn thoroughly to obtain the knowledge of the Ethics of Western and Eastern philosophers. As Ethics is the philosophical study of morals, it is the necessity for all human beings. The students will study how to be familiar with the Theoretical Ethics and better understand it. They will also learn how to choose the important principles and facts of the course.

-   The frame of the course is based on the topics mentioned below;

  1. The Nature and Scope of Ethics

1.1. Ethics and the Ideas of Value                                                            

1.2. Ethics and Philosophy                        

1.3. Ethics and Morality                

1.4. The Role of Ethics as Moral Philosophy in Today’s World   

  1. The Fundamental Concepts of Ethical Problems

2.1. The ‘Is’ and the ‘Ought’                                

2.2. The ‘Absolute’ and the ‘Relative’

2.3. The ‘Subjective’ and the ‘Objective’

2.4. The ‘Formal’ and the ‘Teleological’   

2.5. The ‘Egoistic’ and the ‘Altruistic’

2.6. ‘Freedom’ and ‘Moral Responsibility’

2.7. ‘Right’ and ‘Duty’                 

  1. A General Study of Some Western Ethical Theories

3.1. Ancient Greek Ethics             

3.2. Utilitarian Ethics                                                        

3.3. Sociological Ethics

3.4. Evolutionary Ethics

3.5. Kantian Ethics            

3.6. The Ethics of G.E. Moore (cognitivism / nonnaturalism)

3.7. The Ethical View of John Dewey (naturalism)

3.8. The Ethical View of A. J. Ayer (emotivism / noncognitivism)

3.9. Existentialist Ethics    

  1. A General Study of Some Eastern Ethical Theories

4.1. Indian Ethics  

4.1.1. The Ethics of Bhagavadgita

4.1.2. Carvaka’s Hedonism   

4.1.3. Buddhist Ethics

4.2. Chinese Ethics

4.2.1. The Confucian Ethics

4.2.2. The Taoist Ethics

4.2.3. The Ethical View of Mo Tzu

4.3. Japanese Ethics

4.3.1. The Ethical View of Nishida Kitarō

4.3.2. The Ethical View of Watsuji Tetsurō

4.3.3. The Ethical View of Tominaga Nakamoto

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this module are -

  • to acquaint students with the nature and scope of Ethics,
  • to help them understand Ethics, the Ideas of value, Ethics and Philosophy,
  • to make them fully understand Ethics and Morality,
  • to enable them to know role of Ethics as Moral Philosophy in today’s world.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the course, students will be able to -

  • explain the intimate relationship between Ethics and Morality,
  • examine the moral rules and regulations, moral values, norms, ideals and patterns,
  • analyze the doubts about what would be the right thing to do or which course of action to be chosen, from a multiple choice of actions or when courses of action to be chosen are in conflict or incompatible,
  • describe the problems of humanitarianism discussed by many scholars from different points of view,
  • distinguish between what is ‘is’ and what is ‘ought’.

Module No : MS 3103

Module Name : Buddhist Culture and Myanmar Traditional Thought

(FOR Myanmar Studies Specialization)

  1. Introducing Buddhist Culture and the essence of Buddhism

1.1. The life of Buddha

1.2. Four Noble Truth

1.3. To Abstain from the Extreme and to practice the Right Way

1.4. Straightening One’s view

  1. The Concept of Reality

2.1. Concept of Reality in Myanmar Traditional Thought

2.2. The Ledi Sayadaw exponds a system on the world under three headings

2.3. Law of Causation

2.4. Acceptance of Nibbana

2.5. Myanmar Proverbs

  1. The Concept of Knowledge in Myanmar Traditional Thought

3.1. The Nature of Epistemology

3.2. Sources and Origin of Knowledge

3.3. Wisdom and Knowledge

3.4. The Process of Knowledge in Ledi Sayadaw

3.5. The Role of “Intuition” in Myanmar Thought

3.6. The Concept of Wisdom in Myanmar Traditional Thought

  1. Law of Change

4.1. Problem of Change

4.2. Change as Unreal

4.3. Change as Real

4.4. Modern Philosophers’ Views

4.5. Myanmar Philosophical Thought on Change

  1. Sociology

5.1. Social Philosophy

5.2. Concept of Society in Myanmar Traditional Thought

5.3. Human Nature in Myanmar Traditional Thought

5.4. The Relationship between Individual and Society

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

SEMESTER - II

Module No.

Name of Module

Credit Points

Hours Per Week

Lecture

Tutorial

Eng 3002

English

3

2

2

Phil 3107

Eastern Aesthetics

4

3

2

Phil 3108

Advanced Logic-II

4

3

2

Phil 3109

Philosophy of History-II

4

3

2

Phil 3110

Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking-II

4

3

2

Elective

*

3

2

2

 

Total

22

16

12

Total Credits (22)

Total Hours (28)

 

Foundation Course                          

Eng 3002         English                                   

Core Courses                                    

Phil 3107         Eastern Aesthetics                             

Phil 3108         Advanced Logic-II                            

Phil 3109         Philosophy of History-II                                

Phil 3110         Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking - II

Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization)                          

Phil 3111         A Study of Philosophical Texts - II                           

Phil 3112         Ethics-II (Applied Ethics)                                                                      

Note: Excerpts from Phil. 3110 Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Ways of Thinking II for the partial fulfillment of Local Needs.

* A student will have to take one elective. 

Module No                 : Phil 3107

Module Name            : Eastern Aesthetics

COURSE OBJECTIVE

-   Aesthetics is a study of art from the philosophical point of view. This module covers the Indian Aesthetics, Chinese Aesthetics, Japanese Aesthetics and Myanmar Aesthetics. Students will learn how to identify the Indian Aesthetics, Chinese Aesthetics, Japanese Aesthetics and Myanmar Aesthetics; how artists and philosophers interpret Rasa in different ways etc. These skills will give students appreciation of traditional music, song, dance and custom. And then they will come to love nature and understand the environmental conservation and sustainable development.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. A Study of Some Eastern Aesthetics

1.1. Indian Aesthetics

1.2. Chinese Aesthetics

1.3. Japanese Aesthetics

  1. Myanmar Aesthetics

2.1. Introduction to Myanmar Aesthetics

2.2. Zayya’s View on Art                

2.3. Zawgyi’s View on Art

2.4. Dagon Taryar’s View on Art     

2.5. Letwae Minnyo’s View on Art

2.6. Min Thu Wun’s View on Art

2.7. Shwe Don B Aung’s View on Film

2.8. Director U Thu Kha’s View on Film and Art

2.9. Bagyi Aung Soe’s View on Art

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help them understand the term rasa and its important role in Aesthetics,
  • to enable them to understand the relation between Art and philosophy in Chinese Culture,
  • to help them realize a key to understand the Japanese culture,
  • to enthuse them to appreciate the true nature of traditional art of Myanmar artists,
  • to help them realize the relation of the artistic ideas of Myanmar scholars and art works.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After completion of study, students will be able to -

  • love the nature and traditional culture,
  • upgrade their skill of discussion, creative, communicative and presentation,
  • <span style=\
6 Second Year (Honours)

SEMESTER - I

Module No.

Name of Module

Credit Points

Hours Per Week

Lecture

Tutorial

Phil 4101

Philosophy of Religion-I

4

3

2

Phil 4102

Problems of Philosophy-I

4

3

2

Phil 4104

Research Methodology in Philosophy-I

4

3

2

Phil 4105

Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy-I

4

3

2

Phil 4106

Political Philosophy (West)

4

3

2

Elective

 

3

2

2

 

Total

23

17

12

Total Credits (23)

Total Hours (29)

 

Core Courses                                    

Phil 4101         Philosophy of Religion-I                                

Phil 4102         Problems of Philosophy-I                              

Phil 4104         Research Methodology in Philosophy-I

Phil 4105         Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy-I

Phil 4106         Political Philosophy (West)

Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization)

Phil 4103         Philosophy of Science-I

Phil 4113         Philosophy of Language-I     

Core Course (for Myanmar Studies Specialization)         

MS 4104         A Study of Myanmar Moral Principles

* A student will have to take one elective.

Module No.                : Phil 4101

Module Name            : Philosophy of Religion-I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-    Philosophy of religion is a philosophical reflection on religion. This module covers four great religions of the world and essential characteristics of these religions. Students will learn how to define the philosophy of religion; how to analyze the religion and Theology, religion and problem of evils; how to examine the problem with religious concept and languages.

-    The frame of the course is based on the topics mentioned below;

  1. Introduction to Philosophy of Religion
  2. Approaches to Philosophy of Religion
  3. The Four Religions of the World and their Philosophical Trends
  4. Analytical Study of Philosophy of Religion
  5. The Critical Examination of the Philosophy of Religion

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this module are -

  • to demonstrate the four kinds of world religion,
  • to discuss the philosophy of religion,
  • to help them understand the respective philosophers’ views on religion,
  • to explain the nature of religion,
  • to distinguish philosophy of religion and theology.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After studying the module, students will be able to -

  • explain the philosophy of religion,
  • examine the four kinds of world religion, and deeply understand the essence of each religion.
  • analyze the religion and Theology, religion and problem of evils,
  • examine the problems with religious concept and languages,

Module No.                : Phil 4102

Module Name            : Problems of Philosophy – I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   Problems of philosophy are the study of philosophical inquiry, both of science and in everyday life. This module covers the nature of philosophical problem, the problem concerning the origin and source of knowledge and some epistemological problems. Students will learn how the daily life problem is different from the philosophical problems; how to apply theory of the problem to solve the daily life problems.

-    The frame of the course is based on the topics mentioned below;

  1. The Nature of Philosophical Problems
  2. A Study of Some Epistemological Problems

2.1. The Problem Concerning the Origin and Source of Knowledge

2.1.1. Reason versus Perception

2.1.2. Intuition

2.1.3. Testimony

2.2. Problem of Truth

2.2.1. The Correspondence Theory

2.2.2. The Coherence Theory

2.2.3. The Pragmatic Theory

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to enable students, understand the nature of philosophical inquiry and its values,
  • to help them solve the philosophical issues from the daily life problem,
  • to let them study the problems of the origin and sources of knowledge,
  • to enable them differentiate between reason and perception,
  • to give them the understanding of the nature and solutions of the problem of truth.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After completion of the module, students will be able to -

  • analyze the daily life problem from the philosophical problem,
  • explain the problem of philosophy which is an important role to solve the social problem,
  • verify the correctness of their knowledge and beliefs with theory of truth.
  • apply theory of the problem to solve the daily life problems.

Module No.                : Phil 4104

Module Name            : Research Methodology in Philosophy - I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-  Research methodology is the specific procedures or techniques used to identify, select, process, and analyze information about a topic. This module covers some research methods, research problems and research principles. Students will learn how to acknowledge the characteristics of truth research; how to identify quantitative and qualitative research; how to study the ways of thinking and rule of strategy etc. These skills have better understand published works, ways of balance collaborative and individual work; determine an area of interest, and jump start their careers as researchers.

-    The frame of the course is based on the topics of;

  1. The Nature and Role of Research in Conceptual Learning
  2. A General Study of Research Methodology

2.1. Research Problem        

2.2. Research Hypothesis            

2.3. Research Methods         

2.4. Research Finding        

2.5. Research Principle                

2.6. Contribution

2.7. Definitions of Key words

  1. Ways of Thinking and Research Methodology

    - Methods of Thinking

  1. What is a Research Problem?

    - Data Collection and Literature Review

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to enable students, understand the characteristics of truth research,
  • to empower them with knowledge of research methodology,
  • to let them get the knowledge of writing philosophical papers,
  • to make them realize the typical organizational pattern for research paper,
  • to become familiar with the literature survey.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After completion of the module, students will be able to -

  • upgrade their skills of data analyzing,
  • carry out research or project on their own,
  • apply the research methods with a logical flow of thought in daily life.

Module No.                : Phil 4105

Module Name            : Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy – I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

- This module is to explain the background of Indian thought and the outstanding Indian Philosophers’ views. The students will learn twentieth century Indian philosophy as “interpretative and not creative”. It does not need any argument to show that “interpretation” and “creative thinking” are not completely exclusive of each other. They will study that twentieth century Indian thinkers also try to re-interpret some of the ancient ideas derived chiefly from the Upanisads. Furthermore, the twentieth century Indian thinkers acknowledge the reality of suffering and the possibility of an escape from it and yet they approach the problems in different ways.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. A Brief Study of the Background of Indian Thought
  2. A Critical Study of the Outstanding Indian Philosophers’ views

2.1. The Philosophy of S. Radhakrishnan

2.2. The Philosophy of Sri Aurobindo

2.3. The Philosophy of Rabindranath Tagore

2.4. The Philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to accept the reality of the world and also of the bodily aspect of man,
  • to help students know that the twentieth century Indian thinkers are very faithful to the tradition of philosophy,
  • to show that the twentieth century Indian thinkers are still struggling with the same old problems,
  • to regard that the twentieth century Indian thinkers, believe philosophy as essentially tied up with up,
  • to become acquainted with the world-famous Indian thinkers.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After completion of this module, students will be able to -

  • realize that philosophy is an attitude-a way of looking at things,
  • apply philosophical knowledge that can adopt an entirely different perspective from the one that we normally adopt,
  • divide by man’s own inner power and decisions,
  • comprehend Gandhi’s non-violence, Satyāgraha, which had succeeded in solving smaller problems of life, could also be effectively used for solving greater problems like, ‘political slavery’.

Module No.                : Phil 4106

Module Name            : Political Philosophy (West)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   The Political philosophy is a sub-subject of philosophy. This module covers the nature of political thought; essential political concepts; Political thought of medieval and Modern philosophers and recently political thought etc. Students will learn how political thought is related to science, philosophy, ethics, religion, economic theory and literature or traditional doctrines and superstitions; how western political theory is valuable also as an aid to the interpretation of history.

  • The frame of the module is based on the topics mentioned below;
  1. Introduction
  2. Essential Political Concepts
  3. Ancient Greek and Roman Political Institutions and Political Philosophy
  4. Medieval Political Philosophy
  • Machiavelli
  1. Modern Political Philosophies
  2. Social Contract Theories
  3. Political Theories of the French Revolution
  4. Political Philosophy of Adam Smith and Malthus
  5. Marxist Political Thought
  6. Recent Political Thoughts

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help students know political thoughts and political institutions,
  • to understand Nature of Greek Political Thought,
  • to perceive Roman theories of law and distinct thoughts,
  • to recognize the changes of political Thoughts under the close Middle Ages,
  • to help them understand the modern theory of sovereignty,
  • to enable them to appreciate the social contract theories,
  • to make them comprehend Recent Political Theory.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After studying the module, students will be able to -

  • apply the political theory to for the development of the state,
  • demonstrate the understanding of the Western Political institutions,
  • discuss the strengths and weakness of National Socialism, Anarchism, Syndicalism,

Guild socialism, Racism, Fascism and Despotism.

SYLLABUS OF ELECTIVE COURSES

(FOR PHILOSOPHY SPECIALIZATION)

Module No.                : Phil 4103

Module Name            : Philosophy of Science-I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-      ThisModuleintroduces the nature and history of science. It states a brief study of the development of science and technology from Greek to contemporary time. It introduces to the Logic and methodology of science. It also illustrates the nature of scientific inference and the nature of hypothesis and explanation.

-      The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. Introduction to the nature and history of science

1.1. The Nature of Science

1.2. The History of Science

  1. A brief study of the development of science and technology from Greek to Contemporary times
  2. Introduction to the Logic and Methodology of Science

3.1. The Nature of Scientific Inference

3.2. The Nature of Hypothesis and Explanation

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to familiarize students with the philosophy of science,
  • to critically analyze the methodology of science,
  • to identify that science is an activity in the explanation, prediction and control of empirical phenomena in a rational manner.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On completion of the study, students will be able to -

  • track the basic structure of science and the connection between science and philosophy,
  • apply the methods of science,
  • analyze what hypothesis is and Wisdom’s view on hypothesis,
  • describe the concept of space and time.

Module No.:   Phil 4113

Module Name: Philosophy of Language-I

  1. Introduction to Philosophy of Language

1.1. Philosophy and Language

1.2. Language and Thought

1.3. Nature, Function and Scope of Philosophy of Language

  1. Western Philosophical Perspectives on Language

2.1. Ancient Greek

        2.1.1. Plato

        2.1.2. Aristotle

2.2. Early Modern Period

        John Locke

  1. The Linguistic Turn of Western Philosophy

3.1. Gottlob Frege

3.2. Bertrand Russell

3.3. Ludwig Wittgenstein

3.4. Ferdinand de Saussure

3.5. George Edward Moore

3.6. Moritz Schlick

3.7. Lev Vygotsky

3.8. Rudolph Carnap

3.9. A. J. Ayer

3.10. Alfred Tarski

3.11. J. L. Austin

3.12. Gilbert Ryle

3.13. Noam Chomsky

  1. Structuralism, Postmodernism and Deconstructionism

4.1. Claude Levi-Strauss

4.2. Michel Foucault

4.3. Jacques Derrida

SYLLABUS of CORE Course FOR OTHER SPECIALIZATION

(FOR MYANMAR STUDIES SPECIALIZATION)

Module No.:   MS 4104

Module Name: A Study of Myanmar Moral Principles

  1. A Study of Causal Relation

1.1. The Definition of the Law of Causation

1.2. The Causal Relation

1.3. The Law of Kamma

1.4. Law of Causation (12 Links)

  1. 2. Myanmar Thought on Morality

2.1. Good and Evil

2.2. Duty

2.3. Justice

  1. Ethical Views in Myanmar Thought

3.1. The View of Good Action

3.2. The Four Cardinal Values

3.3. Thingaza Sayadaw’s View on Duty

3.4. The Characteristics of the Good Man

3.5. The Characteristics of the Wise Person

3.6. The Characteristics of an Ignorant Person

3.6.1. The Characteristics of the bad and foolish man from Lokaniti

3.6.2. The Concept of bad man according to Dhammapada

3.7.   Wisdom as a guide to a good life

3.8.   To Abstain from the Extremes and to practice the Right Way

3.9.   The Way of Mingala Sutta

3.10. The Value of Good

3.11. The Benefits of Mangala Sutta

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

SEMESTER - II

Module No.

Name of Module

Credit Points

Hours Per Week

Lecture

Tutorial

Phil 4107

Philosophy of Religion-II

4

3

2

Phil 4108

Problems of Philosophy-II

4

3

2

Phil 4110

Research Methodology in Philosophy-II

4

3

2

Phil 4111

Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy-II

4

3

2

Phil 4112

Political Philosophy (East)

4

3

2

Elective

 

3

2

2

 

Total

23

17

12

Total Credits (23)

Total Hours (29)

 

Core Courses                                    

Phil 4107         Philosophy of Religion-II                              

Phil 4108         Problems of Philosophy-II                 

Phil 4110         Research Methodology in Philosophy-II

Phil 4111         Twentieth Century Eastern Philosophy-II     

Phil 4112         Political Philosophy (East)

**Phil 4110 (Research Methodology in Philosophy-II) အတွက် Tutorial (၂၀)မှတ်နေရာတွင် Field Trip မှရရှိသော data collection ပေါ်အခြေခံ၍ Field Report တင်စေပြီးလျှင် အမှတ် (၂၀) ကို အစားထိုးပေးရပါမည်။ (BoS Meeting 2/2017) ဆုံဖြတ်ချက်ဖြင့်အတည်ပြပြီး ဖြစ်သည်။

Elective Courses (for Philosophy Specialization)

Phil 4109         Philosophy of Science-II

Phil 4114         Philosophy of Language-II

Note:  A student will have to take one elective.

မှတ်ချက်။         ။ BA နောက်ဆုံးနှစ်ကျောင်းသား၊ ကျောင်းသူများသည် Term Paper/Project Paper တင်သွင်းခြင်းကို ဒုတိယနှစ်ဝက်စာမေးပွဲမဖြေဆိုခင် (၂)ပတ်အလို နောက်ဆုံးထား၍ BA ဘွဲ့ရရှိရန် လိုအပ်ချက်တစ်ရပ် အနေဖြင့် မဖြစ်မနေ ဆောင်ရွက်ရပါမည်။

Module No.                : Phil 4107

Module Name            : Philosophy of Religion-II

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   Philosophy of religion involves all the main areas of philosophy: metaphysics, epistemology, and value theory, philosophy of language, science, history, politics, art, and so on. This module covers the development of religion to various concerns view on the ultimate reality of all religion. Students will learn how Students will learn how to the origin and development of religions came into being; how to relate the man and religion, philosophy and morality etc.

The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. History and Philosophy of Religion
  2. History of Buddhism
  3. Buddhism as Philosophy and Buddhism as Religion
  4. A Comparative Study of Religion
  5. The Critical Examination of Philosophy of Religion

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to have students learn about origin and development of religion,
  • to help understand the difference between religion and philosophy of religion,
  • to make them fully understand the essence and doctrine of Buddhism,
  • to show the contribution of philosophy of religion for religion and philosophy,
  • to criticize philosophy of religion.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After studying the module, students will be able to -

  • explain main purpose of all religion and to find out their liberation from physical and mental suffering,
  • practice for the development of concentration and wisdom used in the noble eightfold parts,
  • discuss that the ultimate concern of different religions.

Module No.                : Phil 4108

Module Name            : Problems of Philosophy-II

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-   Problems of philosophy are the study of philosophical inquiry, both of science and in everyday life. This course covers the ontology and ontological problems, the concept of substance and the problems of human nature in some philosophers. Students will learn how to recognize the reality of being and becoming; what is the problem of substance, how to realize the nature of man.

-   The frame of the course is based on the topics mentioned below;

  1. A Study of Ontological problems

1.1. The problem of Being and Becoming

1.2. The problem of Substance

  1. Ethical problem

2.1. The problem of human nature

2.2. The problem of Individual and society

2.3. The problem of human freedom and determinism

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help students understand the meaning of ontology and the problem of Being and

      Becoming,

  • to enable them to learn the characteristics of materialism and idealism,
  • to let them try to solve the problems of human nature and the problem between individual

and society

  • to let them learn about freedom and determinism.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the module, students will be able to -

  • reproduce and apply the ways of thinking in daily life,
  • analyze the specific issues of daily life,
  • upgrade their social relation,
  • solve social problems in daily life.

Module No.                : Phil 4110

Module Name            : Research Methodology in Philosophy-II

COURSE DESCRIPTION

-    Research methodology is the specific procedure or techniques used to identify, select, process, and analyze information about a topic. This course covers the writing of an abstract, journal article, academic writing and copyright law. Students will learn how to write an abstract; how to insert source notes; how to mention bibliography, diagrams, illustration when they write their term paper as well as research paper. These skills have benefits for academic paper writing.

-   The frame of the course is based on the following topics;

  1. The Writing of an Abstract
  2. The Entry of Notes, Bibliography, Diagrams, Illustration, Contents
  3. Principles of Usage (Words, Citation, etc)
  4. Ethical Consideration

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to familiarize students with different kinds of abstract,
  • to help them to understand bibliographies, references, endnotes, footnotes, attribution and acknowledgement,
  • to enable them to understand language focus citations and tense,
  • to accept plagiarism not only as legal wrong but also as moral wrong.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After studying the module, students will be able to -

  • write an abstract, notes, bibliography which are the necessities of academic writing, term paper or thesis writing skills,
  • apply research methodology to their research.

Module No.                : Phil 4111

Module Name          

7 Third Year (Honours) & Q

BA-HONOURS THIRD YEAR & MA-QUALIFYING

SEMESTER-I

Module No.

Name of Module

 

Credit Points

Hours Per Week

Lecture

Tutorial

Phil 5201

Issues in Indian Philosophy

4

3

2

Phil 5202

Issues in Western Philosophy-I

4

3

2

Phil 5203

Philosophy of Education-I

4

3

2

Phil 5204

Topics in Buddhism-I

4

3

2

Phil 5205

Ethics of Virtue-I (Plato)

4

3

2

Phil 5206

Selected Philosophical Writings-I

4

3

2

 

Total

24

18

12

Total Credits (24)

Total Hours (30)

 

Core Courses            

Phil 5201         Issues in Indian Philosophy

Phil 5202         Issues in Western Philosophy-I

Phil 5203         Philosophy of Education-I

Phil 5204         Topics in Buddhism-I

Phil 5205         Ethics of Virtue-I (Plato)

Phil 5206         Selected Philosophical Writings-I

Core Course (for Myanmar Studies specialization)

MS 5202         Ethical Values in Myanmar Society

Module No.                : Phil 5201

Module Name            :Issues in Indian Philosophy

 COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • According to Indian philosophy, everything in the world is always changing, growing and moving. They accept that nothing in the universe is permanent or eternal. Most of the Indian philosophy is related with Buddhist philosophy. This module covers the studying of the concept of Kamma and causation on non-orthodox and orthodox school of thought in Indian philosophy.
  • The frame of the moduleis based on the topics of;
  1. The Problem of Reality in Indian Philosophy
  • The Law of Kamma
  1. The Problem of Knowledge in Indian Philosophy
  • Means to The Ultimate Goal
  1. The Problem of Causation
  2. Metaphysical Background of Ethical Theories

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this module are -

  • to help students understand The Problem of Reality in Indian Philosophy,
  • to have them realize the Problem of Reality in Indian Philosophy,
  • to enable them to comprehend The Problem of Causation.
  • to discuss Idealism, Materialism and Janism,
  • to study the philosophy of Carvaka.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After the study, students will be able to -

  • discover the nature of Indian philosophy,
  • explain the problem of reality and knowledge in Indian philosophy,
  • classify Idealism, Materialism and Janism.

Module No.                : Phil 5202

Module Name            :Issues in Western Philosophy-I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • Philosophical issues are the topics and questions raised by the study of philosophy. There are several branches of philosophy and many problems. This course covers the concept of reality, mind and metaphysics, truth and doubt of western philosophical issues. Students will learn how time and change affect matter; how to accept the soul made; how are the soul and the body connected; how do our senses work; what is the role of perception play in knowledge; how to distinguish rationalism and empiricism etc.
  • The frame of the course is based on the following topics;
  1. The Problem of Reality

1.1. The Pre-Socratic Materialists

1.2. Early Nonphysical Views of Reality

1.3. Plato's Forms  

1.4. Aristotle's Metaphysics

  1. Mind and Metaphysics

2.1. Rene Descartes

2.2. Baruch Spinoza

2.3. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz

  1. Idealism
  2. The Search for Truth

4.1. Rationalism and Empiricism

4.2. Skepticism

4.2.1. Rene Descartes and the Method of Doubt

4.2.2. David Hume's Skepticism

4.2.3. The Resolution of Skepticism

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to make learnersunderstand the concepts and problem of reality,
  • to help them recognize and evaluate different kind of mind and metaphysics,
  • to enable them to apply the principles of Idealism and Skepticism.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After studying the module, students will be able to -

  • apply the ability to think about Plato’s Forms,
  • understand and use the search for truth,
  • explain and discuss issues in western philosophy as a thinking way to solve problems.

Module No.                :Phil 5203

Module Name            :Philosophy of Education-I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • The philosophy of education examines the goals, forms, methods, and meaning of education from philosophical perspective. This module covers aim and method of education and curriculum. Students will learn how to identify pure philosophies and education philosophies; how to form various kinds of education method.
  • The frame of the moduleis based on the following topics;
  1. Meaning of Philosophy of Education
  2. The Concepts of Education
  3. Values and Education
  4. Ethics and Education
  5. Eastern Philosophies and Education
  6. Idealism and Education
  7. Realism and Education

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to enable students to understand the concepts and nature of philosophy of education,
  • to help them realize that morality is time now to give an account of what it is,
  • to make them recognize eastern philosophies, contribute its philosophical grounds in the respective educational systems,
  • to enable them to analyze and discuss the education aims, method, and curriculums.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the semester, students will be able to -

  • explain the foundational and synoptic nature of philosophical inquiry,
  • demonstrate improvement in their understanding of the major approaches to education and apply them to contemporary problems in society.

Module No.:   Phil 5204

Module Name:Topics in Buddhism-I

  1. The Background of Buddhism

1.1. Upanisad Thinkers      

1.2. 7th B.C. Astika and Nastika Thinkers

  1. Life of the Buddha

2.1. Social Life in the time of Buddha

2.2. Renunciation, Enlightenment and Demise in Kasinagar

  1. A Historical sketch of Buddhism

3.1. 45 Years of Buddha’s Mission           

3.2. Basic Teachings of the Buddha

Module No.                : Phil 5205

Module Name            :Ethics of Virtue-I (Plato)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • This module covers the general study of Plato’s philosophy. It explains justice and other virtues of the middle period. It distinguishes Plato’s view on knowledge and virtue. It discusses the happiness and the desire for self-completion.
  • The frame of the course is based on the following topics;
  1. A General Study of Plato's Philosophy
  2. Plato's View on Knowledge and Virtue

2.1. Plato's conception of Knowledge

2.2. Plato's Conception of Virtue

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to upgrade students’ skills of discussion, harmony and cosmic goodness,
  • to give them a full understanding of the general principles in ethics,
  • to support them to maintain the social life.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the semester, students will be able to -

  • discuss on Plato’s ethics,
  • apply the effective ways of ethics in their daily life,
  • Distinguish virtue, the happiness and the desire for self-completion based on the knowledge acquired from learning this module.

 Module No.                :Phil 5206

Module Name            : Selected Philosophical Writings-I

COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • This module covers truth and theories of knowledge. Especially, students will learn Platonism, logical positivism, pragmatism, rationalism, empiricism, idealism, behaviorism and existentialism. These -isms are used how to approach the truth as extra-sensible reality; as sense-experience. For Plato, genuine knowledge consists the grasping of standards of reality that transcend our sense experience. Furthermore, this course also offers contrasting perspectives on the concept of knowledge how human beings come to their knowledge of things.
  • The frame of the moduleis based on the following topics;
  1. Truth and Knowledge

1.1. Plato: Truth as Extra-Sensible Reality

1.2. A.J. Ayer: Sense-Experience as the Standard of Truth

1.3. William James: The Pragmatist’s Approach to Truth

  1. Theories of Knowledge

2.1. Rene Descartes: Rationalism

2.2. John Locke: Empiricism

2.3. George Berkeley: Epistemological Idealism

2.4. David Hume: The Empirical Grounds of Causal Reasoning

  1. Mind and Matter

3.1. B.F. Skinner: Behaviorism

3.2. Jean-Paul Sartre: Existentialism

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help them differentiate between the theory of knowledge, genuine knowledge and sense-experience for the grasping of standards of reality,
  • to make them contemplate on what is the truth and knowledge,
  • to illustrate them the truth as extra-sensible reality,
  • to enable them to use theory of knowledge in elementary education,
  • to help them practice the perspectives on the concept of knowledge related to elementary education.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the semester, students will be able to -

  • perceive the world of knowledge which is sovereign the parent of intelligence and truth,
  • distinguish the two orders of things in the mind: visible and intelligible,
  • apply a logic-based variant of philosophical counseling,
  • comprehend the determinism which is meant the doctrine that every event in the universe, including human behavior, that can be explained and predicted according to causal laws,
  • analyze the existentialism which is theistic and atheistic.

SYLLABUS OF ELECTIVE COURSE for other specialization

(FOR MYANMAR STUDY SPECIALIZATION)

Module No.:   MS 5202

Module Name:Ethical Values in Myanmar Society

  1. Myanmar Culture and Myanmar Society

1.1. Historical and Geographical Background of Myanmar Culture

1.2. The Nature of Myanmar Thought

1.3. Buddhist Ethics and Myanmar Morality

  1. A Study of Western Moral Views from the aspects of Myanmar Moral Thought

2.1. Consequentialism and Non-consequentialism

2.2. Freedom and Determinism

  1. Myanmar Moral Values

3.1. Written Homilies and Moral Norms

3.2. Mingala Sutta, Singala  Sutta and Myanmar Moral Values (Brahmavihāra Dhamma)

  1. Myanmar's View on Human Existence

4.1. Khandhā, Ayātana , Dhātu

4.2. The Concept of Dependent Origination

  1. Truth and Human Values

5.1. Stages of Purity and Knowledge

5.2. The Way to Truth and Human Values

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 BA-HONOURS THIRD YEAR& MA-QUALIFYING  

SEMESTER-II

Module No.

Name of Module

 

Credit Points

Hours Per Week

Lecture

Tutorial

Phil 5207

Issues in Chinese Philosophy

4

3

2

Phil 5208

Issues in Western Philosophy-II

4

3

2

Phil 5209

Philosophy of Education-II

4

3

2

Phil 5210

Topics in Buddhism-II

4

3

2

Phil 5211

Ethics of Virtue-II (Aristotle)

4

3

2

Phil 5212

Selected Philosophical Writings-II

4

3

2

 

Total

24

18

12

Total Credits (24)

Total Hours (30)

 

Core Courses            

Phil 5207         Issues in Chinese Philosophy

Phil 5208         Issues in Western Philosophy-II

Phil 5209         Philosophy of Education-II

Phil 5210         Topics in Buddhism-II

Phil 5211         Ethics of Virtue-II (Aristotle)

Phil 5212         Selected Philosophical Writings-II

* မှတ်ချက်။     ။ တတိယနှစ်ဂုဏ်ထူးတန်းကျောင်းသား/သူများသည် Term Paper/Project Paper တင်သွင်းခြင်းကို ဒုတိယနှစ်ဝက်စာမေးပွဲမဖြေဆိုခင် (၂)ပတ်အလို နောက်ဆုံးထား၍ BA (Honours)ဘွဲ့ရရှိရန်လိုအပ်ချက် တစ်ရပ်အနေဖြင့် မဖြစ်မနေဆောင်ရွက်ရပါမည်။

Module No.                : Phil 5207

Module Name            :Issues in Chinese Philosophy

 COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • The Chinese system trends towards the social and ethical. They stress the importance of the present life and human effort. They do not discuss the concept of liberation. This module covers some basic moral rules, concept and duty in Chinese philosophy. Students will learn how to define the concept of human nature in some Chinese philosopher.
  • The frame of the course is based on the following topics;
  1. Metaphysical Background of Chinese Philosophy
  2. Moral Problems in Chinese Philosophy

2.1. Problem of Human Nature in Confucianism

2.2. Problem of Human Nature in Neo-Confucianism

  1. 3. Problems of Human Nature in Chinese Philosophy

3.1. Problem of Human Nature in Taoism

3.2. Problem of Human Nature in Neo-Taoism

3.3. Problem of Human Nature in Maoism

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to explain the nature of Chinese philosophy,
  • to enable them to differentiate the nature of Indian and Chinese philosophy,
  • to help them understandand explore the problem of human nature in Confucianism,
  • to help them explore the problem of human nature in Taoism and Monism,
  • to illustrate the metaphysical background of Chinese philosophy.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After this study, students will be able to -

  • explain the nature of Chinese philosophy is humanistic social philosophy,
  • apply Confucius’ humanistic view of duty to dealing with society,
  • analyze the human nature in Confucianism, Taoism and Monism.

Module No.                : Phil 5208

Module Name            :Issues in Western Philosophy-II

 COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • Issues in Western philosophy examines the nature of truth and morality and the good life from the philosophical point of view. This module covers philosophies of process and more and the revival of realism. Students will learn how to explain theory of truth, how to identify ethics of virtue.
  • The frame of the course is based on the following topics;
  1. Philosophies of Process

1.1. Henri Bergson

1.2. John Dewey

1.3. Alfred North Whitehead

  1. Moore and the Revival of Realism
  2. The Nature of Truth

3.1. The Coherence Theory of Truth

3.2. The Pragmatic Theory of Truth

  1. Morality and The Good life

4.1. Aristotle and the Ethics of Virtue

4.2. Egoism versus Altruism

4.3. Duty-defined Morality

4.4. Emmanuel Kant and the Authority of Reason

4.5. Utilitarianism: Jeremy Bentham and J.S. Mill  

4.6. Friedrich Nietzsche and the Attack on Morality

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to convince students the different kinds of philosophies’ process,
  • to help them apply the principles of Realism,
  • to give them the ability to identify theory of truth,
  • to analyze the ethics of virtue,
  • to define morality as duty.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the semester, students will be able to -

  • understand and use the search for philosophicalprocess,
  • analyze the specific issues of the nature of truth,
  • cultivate a good moral life for their society.

Module No.                : Phil 5209

Module Name            :Philosophy of Education-II

COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • The philosophy of education is the criticism of the general theory of education. This module covers critical evaluation and systematic reflection upon general theories. Students will learn how to synthesize of educational facts with educational values; how to classify the different types of educational method etc. These skills give them the ability to think logically.
  • The frame of the moduleis based on the following topics;
  1. Pragmatism and Education

1.1. Pragmatism as a Philosophy of Education                                         

1.1.1. Aim of Education                                                          

1.1.2. Method of Education                                                    

1.1.3. Democracy and Education                                            

1.2. Critique of Pragmatism in Education                                     

  1. Existentialism, Phenomenology, and Education

2.1. Existentialist Philosophers and Their Thoughts                                 

2.2. Existentialism in Modern Life                                                

2.3. Phenomenological Philosophers and Their Thought                          

2.4. Existentialism and Phenomenology in Philosophy of Education       

2.5. Critique of Existentialism and Phenomenology in Education           

  1. Analytic Philosophy and Education

3.1. The Analytic Movement in Philosophy                                              

3.2. Philosophical Analysis and Philosophy of Education                        

3.3. Critique of Analytic Philosophy in Education                                   

  1. Reconstructionism and Education

4.1. Philosophy of Reconstructionism                                           

4.2. Reconstructionism as Philosophy of Education                                 

4.2.1. Aim of Education                                                          

4.2.2. Method of Education                                                    

4.2.3. Curriculum                                                                     

4.3. Critique of Reconstructionism in Education                          

  1. Behaviourism and Education

5.1. Behaviourism as Philosophy of Education                                         

5.1.1. Aims                                                                  

5.1.2. Methods                                                            

5.2. Critique of Behaviourism in Education                                              

  1. Marxism and Education

6.1. The Philosophy Karl Marx                                                     

6.2. Western Marxism and Critical Theory                                   

6.3. Marxism as Philosophy of Education                                     

6.3.1. Aims                                                                  

6.3.2. The Socialist Consciousness                                          

6.3.3. Methods and Curriculum                                              

6.4. Critique of Marxism in Education                                          

  1. Philosophy, the Theory and Practice of Education

7.1. The Nature of Educational Theory                                         

7.2. Philosophy, Educational Theory and Pra

8 First Year (MA)

SEMESTER- I

Module No.

Name of Module

Credit Unit

Hours Per Week

Lecture

Tutorial

Phil 611

Logic and Research Methodology

4

4

2

Phil 612

Social philosophy

4

4

2

Phil 613

Axiological Studies

4

4

2

Phil 614

Special Topics in Eastern Philosophy

4

4

2

Total

 

16

16

8

 Total Credit (16)

Total Hours (24)

 

Core Courses                         

Phil 611   Logic and Research Methodology

Phil 612   Social Philosophy

Phil 613   Axiological Studies

Phil 614   Special Topics in Eastern Philosophy

 

Module No.               : Phil 611

Module Name          : Logic and Research Methodology

COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • A logical truth is a statement which is true regardless of the truth or falsity of its constituent propositions. This module covers some basic rules, concept and skill of logic and research methodology. Students will learn how to use truth tree to check the validity, consistency and equivalent of the propositions; how to use the quantification theory to proof the validity of deductive arguments; how to write an educational research paper using deduction and induction. These skills have lifelong benefits for improving one’s writing, thinking and critical assessment of ideas. Every researcher knows the significance of research methodology.
  • The frame of the course is based on the following topics;
  1. The Nature of Logical Truth

1.1. Formal Validity

1.2. Material Truth

  1. Theory of Quantification
  2. Inductive Logic

3.1. Induction as Probable Inference in relation to Deduction

3.2. Problems of Inductive Inferences

3.3. Inductive Inferences and Theory of Probability

  1. A Comparative Study of Formal and Informal Logic
  2. Research Methodology

5.1. Research Design

5.2. Academic Writing

5.3. Doing Philosophy (A Guide to the writing of Philosophy Paper)

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this module are -

  • to support students to understand the solution of different kinds of the relations of proposition,
  • to enable them to recognize the different kinds of proving the argument forms,
  • to help them understand induction as probable inference in relation to deduction,
  • to enable them to use research methodology to writing an academic research paper.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the course, students will be able to -

  • practice for getting effective communicative skill foe relation with other people,
  • present effective discussion and do critical assessment in any field of work,
  • design their academic research using knowledge of research methodology.

 

Module No.               : Phil 612

Module Name          : Social Philosophy

COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • An individual is born in a society and thereafter he interacts with society all his life. Society serves as soil and his personality is nurtured. History is a distinctive and rich species of intellectual endeavor. Philosophy of history is concerned with truth of historical statements.
  • The frame of the course is based on the topics mentioned below;
  1. Nature of Social Philosophy

            1.1. Definition of Social Philosophy

            1.2. Social Philosophy and Sociology

  1. A Brief Study of the Origin and Development of Social Philosophy (East and West)
  2. A Critical Study of Some Theories of Social Philosophy (East and West)

    (Michiavelli, Vico, Hobbes, Locke. Hume, Voltaire, Rousseau, Dilthy, Collingwood, Northrop, Jaspers, Hegel, Karl Marx, John Rawls, Chinese Philosophers, Indian Philosophers)

  1. Some Sociological Problems in Social Philosophy
  2. The Value of Social Philosophy

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to familiarize students with the nature of social philosophy and historical studies,
  • to help them understand social environment.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On completion of the course, students will be able to -

  • apply knowledge of social philosophy in society,
  • analyze the nature of human environment,
  • determine the goal of human life.

 

Module No.               : Phil 613

Module Name          : Axiological Studies

COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • Axiology is the philosophical study of value. It is either the collective term for ethics and aesthetics. This module covers ethical values and aesthetical values. Students will learn and attempt how to lay out principles regarding value; how to critically examine two kinds of values: ethics and aesthetics. These skills give them the notions that everyone possess values which guide thoughts, actions and behaviors in one’s life.
  • The frame of the course is based on the following topics;
  1. Aesthetics

1.1. Aesthetic theories of Art

1.2. A Critical Examination of Some Aesthetic Problems

  1. Ethics

2.1. A Review of Theoretical Ethics

2.2. Applied Ethics

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help students realize moral values and aesthetic values,
  • to enable them to criticize some aesthetic problems,
  • to apply ways of the ethics of environmental conservation.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After studying this module, students will be able to -

  • explain the problem of “Form and Content”,
  • employ theories of professional ethics and applied ethics,
  • apply relevant philosophical analysis to real world situations.

 

Module No.                             : Phil 614

Module Name                         : Special Topics in Eastern Philosophy

COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • This module covers the rules and concepts of some -isms in Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean philosophy and Myanmar philosophical thoughts. Eastern philosophy includes various philosophies that originated in Eastand South Asia including Chinese, Indian, Japanese, Korean and Myanmar philosophies. Students will learn contemporary Indian thoughts, Confucianism, Japanese culture and main current of Korean thoughts. In Myanmar philosophical thoughts, the students will study how to think logically to ontology, epistemology, ethics, art and aesthetics.    
  • The frame of the course is based on following the topics;
  1. Indian Philosophy (Any One)

1.1. The Philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi

1.2. The Philosophy of Radhakrishnan

  1. Chinese Philosophy (Any One)

2.1. Taoism

2.2. Neo- Confucianism

  1. Japanese philosophy (Any One)

3.1. Shinto and Japanese Culture

3.2. Zen Buddhism

  1. Korean Philosophy (Any One)

4.1. Main Current of Korean Thought

4.2. Confucianism in Korean Thought

  1. Myanmar Philosophical Thought (Any Two)

5.1. Ontological Views in Myanmar Philosophical Thought

5.2. Epistemological Views in Myanmar Philosophical Thought

5.3. Ethical Views in Myanmar Philosophical Thought

5.4. Art and Aesthetics in Myanmar Philosophical Thought

5.5. Logical Thinking in Myanmar Philosophical Thought

5.6. Cultural Views in Myanmar Philosophical Thought

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this module are -

  • to help students understand the contemporary Indian thought,
  • to support them to differentiate the philosophy of Indian and Chinese although the same eastern philosophy,
  • to analyze the eastern philosophy including Myanmar,
  • to recognize the different views in Myanmar philosophical thought,
  • to provide them a chance to study the nature of Myanmar

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On completion of the semester, students will be able to -

  • describe the unique combination of ancient Indian ideals of sainthood and contemporary statesmanship,
  • solve the immediate problem of life and society without sacrificing basic principles of ethics and religion,
  • distinguish the reality of existing human situation,
  • apprehend the nature of pure fact,
  • differentiate the intimate relationship between culture, art and aesthetics.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Research Works

Phil 631   Seminar-I                                                                 Phil 632   Seminar-II

Phil 633   Research and Progress Report Phil 634   Research Outline and their

Presentation

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

SEMESTER-II

Module No.

Name of Module

Credit Unit

Hours Per Week

Lecture

Tutorial

Phil 621

Philosophy of Science

4

4

2

Phil 622

Philosophy of Historical Studies

4

4

2

Phil 623

Philosophy of Culture

4

4

2

Phil 624

Special Topics in Western Philosophy

4

4

2

Total

 

16

16

8

Total Credit (16)

Total Hours (24)

 

Core Courses                         

Phil 621   Philosophy of Science

Phil 622   Philosophy of Historical Studies

Phil 623   Philosophy of Culture

Phil 624                   Special Topics in Western Philosophy

 

Module No.               : Phil 621

Module Name          : Philosophy of Science

COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • Philosophy of science is a branch of philosophy concerned with the foundations, methods, and implications of science. This module covers the rules, concept, theories and skill of philosophy of science. Students will learn how historical developments of the philosophy of science come about; how to apply theories, method and law in science. The central questions of this study are what qualifies science, the reliability of scientific theories, and the ultimate purpose of science.
  • The frame of the module is based on the following topics;
  1. Historical Development of the Philosophy of Science
  2. Foundation of Science

2.1. Empirical foundation of science

2.2. Rational foundation of science

2.3. Metaphysical foundation of science

  1. Methods of Science

3.1. Methods of the Natural Sciences

3.2. Methodological Problems of the Social Sciences

  1. Scientific Law and Theory

4.1. The Logical Character of scientific Laws

4.2. Experimental laws and theories

4.3. The Cognitive Status of Theories

  1. Space, Time and Causality

5.1. Newton’s view on Space and Time

5.2. Einstein’s concept of Space and Time

5.3. Hawking’s view of Time

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help students understand the Historical Development of the Philosophy of Science,
  • to support them to learn the Logical Character of scientific Laws,
  • to become familiar with methodological problems of the Social Sciences,
  • to enable them to realize the concept of Space, Time and Causality in some scientific philosophers.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the semester, students will be able to -

  • explain the characteristics of science are systematic observation and experimentation, inductive and deductive reasoning, and the formation and testing of hypotheses and theories,
  • judge the causality related to the space and time.

 

Module No.               : Phil 622

Module Name          : Philosophy of Historical Studies

COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • Philosophy of History should not be carried on isolation from other branches of philosophy. It needs to be explicitly comparative. History seems to resemble the natural sciences in seeking truth and explanation.
  • The frame of the course is based on the following topics;
  1. Philosophy and History

1.1. Meaning of History: History as the ‘first order’ study

1.2. Philosophy of History as a ‘second order’ study

1.3. Philosophy of History as process

1.4. Distinction between Analytic and Substantive Philosophy of history

  1. Explanation in History

2.1. Meaning of Description, Interpretation and Explanation

2.2. Law Explanation; Rational Explanation: Narrative as Explanatory

  1. Determinism and Indeterminism in History

3.1. The role of causation in History

3.2. The role of Necessity and Chance, Constraint and Free will

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help students study philosophy and history,
  • to enable them to understand explanation in history,
  • to let them comprehend determinism and indeterminism,
  • to enable them to understand philosophy of history as process,
  • to state the role of causation in history.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of the semester, students will be able to -

  • classify philosophy and history,
  • examine determinism and indeterminism,
  • discuss the role of causation in history.

 

Module No.               : Phil 623

Module Name          : Philosophy of Culture

COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • Philosophy of Culture, a branch of philosophy that studies the essence and meaning of culture. This course covers the characteristics and knowledge of a particular group of people, encompassing language, religion, music and art etc. Students will learn how to relate each culture and cultural system in the world. These skills have an overview of the main theories of culture.
  • The frame of the course is based on the topics mentioned below;
  1. Scientific Definition of Culture

1.1. Culture as the subject of scientific investigation

1.2. A minimum definition of science for the Humanist

1.3. What culture is

  1. Facts and Values in Culture

2.1. Observation and description of facts

2.2. Description of Values

  1. Empirical study of Culture

3.1. The analysis of Inquiry

3.2. The analysis of the Problems

3.3. The Natural History Stage of Inquiry

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this module are -

  • to help students understand the nature of culture from a philosophical point of view,
  • to make them realize the question of ‘What is culture?’ by paying particular attention to the views of culture as society,
  • to acquaint them with the key theories, problems and arguments of the philosophy of culture.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

After this study, students will be able to -

  • critically understand, comment and interconnect the major texts and theories related to culture,
  • present a consistent view of the basic points of disagreements about culture and its constitution.

 

Module No.               : Phil 624

Module Name          : Special Topics in Western Philosophy

COURSE DESCRIPTION

  • This module covers the special topics in western philosophy. It consists the idea of existence and basic structure of existence. Students will learn about ‘what is authentic existence and inauthentic existence? how to use the phenomenological method; how to obtain the knowledge by acquaintance and knowledge by description. These are the main themes in this field and the students will also learn them effectively.
  • The frame of the module is based on the following topics ;
  1. A Study of the Idea of Existence

1.1. Essence, Existence and Basic Structure of Existence

1.2. Relation between Existence and World

1.3. Authentic Existence and Inauthentic Existence

  1. A Study of the Existentialism with reference to one of the following philosophers

2.1. Sǿren Kierkegaard

2.2. Karl Jaspers

2.3. Martin Heidegger

2.4. Jean-Paul Sartre

2.5. Albert Camus

  1. A Study of Phenomenological Method with Reference to One of the Following Philosophers

3.1. Edmund Husserl

3.2. Martin Heidegger

  1. Philosophy of Bertrand Russell
  • Knowledge by Acquaintance and Knowledge by Description,
  1. Philosophy of George Santayana
  • Concept of Reality
  1. Philosophy of Whitehead
  • Concept of Reality
  1. Philosophy of John Dewey
  • The Theory of Inquiry
  1. A Study of Postmodern Thought with Reference to One of the Following Philosophers

8.1. Michel Foucault

8.2. Jacques Derrida

8.3. Richard Rorty

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objectives of this course are -

  • to help students apprehend the relation between existence and world,
  • to support them to differentiate the authentic existence and inauthentic existence,
  • to enable them to analyze the main themes of Existentialists’ philosophy,
  • to make them understand the realists’ view on the concept of reality,
  • to give them a chance to touch what postmodernism is.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon completion of the module, students will be able to -

  • obtain the knowledge of the philosophy of existentialists,
  • realize that the existentialism is the result of a recent attempt to study the human phenomenon more closely and this clearly leads to the existentialist philosophy of today,
  • categorize the knowledge by acquaintance and knowledge by description,
  • judge how different postmodernism is from modernism,
  • design the essential themes of postmodernism which is not always compatible with one another.
9 Second Year (MA)

SEMESTER-I

Module No.

Module Name

Credit Unit

Credit Point

Phil 631

Seminar-I

4

4

Phil 632

Seminar-II

4

4

Phil 633

Research and Progress Report

4

4

Phil 634

Research Outline and their Presentation

4

4

Total

16

16

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SEMESTER-II

Module No.

Module Name

Credit Unit

Credit Point

Phil 641

Research and Seminar

8

8

Phil 642

Thesis and Viva Voce

8

8

Total

16

16

Research Works

Phil 641           Research and Seminar

Phil 642           Thesis and Viva Voce

မှတ်ချက်။         (၁)   ပထမနှစ်တွင် Semester-I + II အတွက် Total Credit Unit (32) ပြည့်မှသာလျှင် ဒုတိယနှစ်တွင် မဟာဝိဇ္ဇာဘွဲ့ ကျမ်းပြုစုရန် ခွင့်ပြုမည်ဖြစ်သည်။

                        (၂) ဒုတိယနှစ်တွင် Semester-I ရှိ Module (၂)ခု (Phil.613, Phil 632)နှင့် Semester-II ရှိ Module (၁)ခု (Phil.641)၊ စုစုပေါင်း Module (၃)ခုအတွက် Module တစ်ခုစီတွင် Research Report တစ်ခုတင်ပြီး Research Seminar တစ်ကြိမ်ပြုလုပ်ရပါမည်။ Module တစ်ခုစီအတွက် Credit Unit (8) ဟုသတ်မှတ်ပါသည်။

                        (၃) ဒုတိယနှစ် တွင် Semester-II ရှိကျန် Module (၁)ခု (Phil.642) အတွက် မဟာဝိဇ္ဇာကျမ်းတင်သွင်းရမည်ဖြစ်ပြီး Viva Voce ဖြေဆိုရမည်ဖြစ်သည်။ ၎င်း Module အတွက် Credit Unit (8) ဟုသတ်မှတ်ပါသည်။

                        (၄) ဒုတိယနှစ်တွင် Semester-I +II အတွက် Total Credit Univt (32) ပြည့်မှသာလျှင် မဟာဝိဇ္ဇာဘွဲ့ အတွက်ပြီးမြောက်မည်ဖြစ်သည်။